RESOLUTION, by Sandy Seaton Sallee

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RESOLUTION
by Sandy Seaton Sallee

I catapulted yesterday
Atop my brand new steed
We somersaulted off the hill
I didn’t even bleed.

Today I crept out of my bed
My tailbone’s in revolt
I ignored his warning signs
I’d by-gosh ride that colt!

Last year I led a spooky mule
Tied to a spotted App
The mule was calm but Appy ran
A fast Olympic lap.

Back corkscrewed but chiropractor
Got me cranked in place
No one could see the black-and-blue
‘Cept marks on my face.

Three surg’ries on my shoulders
The screws have been removed
A walking cast repaired my foot
My insurance approved.

I broke my neck while roping steers
That gelding sure could buck
I’m wired now from end to end
I’m tight with Lady Luck.

Both knees are orthoscopic-fixed
My right wrist has a pin
My skull sports quilted stitching marks
I have a crooked grin.

An old friend watched me limp one day
The words he said still lash
“Your mind is writing checks for you
Your body just can’t cash.”

Next time I’m sure I won’t buck off
I’ve discovered the solution
I’ll have no choice for now that goal’s
My New Year’s Resolution!

© 2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee, used with permission.

 

Popular poet and wilderness guide Sandy Seaton Sallee says the poem is, “All true, unfortunately!” Last week she shared a photo for Jay Snider’s “Tyrone and Tyree,” and it’s a pleasure to have another photo from her, in her element.

Sandy and her husband Scott run Black Mountain Outfitters, located in the heart of Paradise Valley, just north of Yellowstone National Park in Montana and also Slough Creek Outfitters, offering world-famous Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout fishing. Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at blackmountainoutfitters.com and at CowboyPoetry.com.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and this photograph with this post, but for any other uses, request permission.)

TYRONE AND TYREE by Jay Snider

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photo © 2015, Sandy Seaton Sallee

 

TYRONE AND TYREE
by Jay Snider

I’ve learned lots of lessons
’bout cowboyin’ up
’cause I’ve been a cowboy
since I was a pup

And my dad taught me
just like his dad taught him
rewards without effort
come seldom and slim

And if workin’ for wages
or bossin’ a crew
a job left half finished
reflects upon you

And good leaders of men
who while bossin’ the crew
won’t ask of their men
what they wouldn’t do

‘Cause men are just men
and it’s by God’s design
we all pull on our britches
one leg at a time

But some men are leaders
while others hold back
they stray off the trail
and are hard to untrack

But with proper persuasion
will likely fall in
’cause that’s just the nature
Of hosses and men

Which put me to thinkin’
’bout Tyrone and Tyree
the best team of Belgians
you ever did see

Why they’d lay in those collars
and pull stride for stride
work sunup to sundown
till the day that they died

But Tyree would get balky
not pull like he should
so Tyrone would reach over
and scold him right good

Then the load they were pullin’
would even right out
that’s the lesson in life
that I’m talkin’ about

‘Cause some hosses are leaders
while some will pull back
they’ll stray off the trail
and are hard to untrack

But with proper persuasion
will likely fall in
see, that’s just the nature
of hosses and men

Which put me to thinkin’
’bout what Dad had said
and a couple of visions
then danced in my head

In my mirror, while shavin’
which one will I see
could I be Tyrone
or would I be Tyree

And to leaders of men
let’s all raise a cup
here’s to pullin’ your weight
and to cowboyin’ up

© 2005, Jay Snider
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Popular Oklahoma rancher, poet, and songwriter Jay Snider is known for his own writing and as well for his fine reciting.

He has a recent CD, “Classic Cowboy Poetry: The Old Tried and True,” which showcases his fine reciting. He delivers poems by Bruce Kiskaddon, Henry Herbert Knibbs, Will Ogilvie, Sunny Hancock, and others, to carry listeners back to time when, to quote Kiskaddon, “cattle were plenty and people were few.”

Enjoy his rendition of Sunny Hancock’s (1931-2003) “The Bear Tale” in a video from the Western Folklife Center’s 2011 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

Find Jay at the 32nd annual Texas Cowboy Poetry Gathering, March 2-3, 2018 in Alpine, Texas among this year’s outstanding lineup.

Jay is one of the Friday night headliners, along with Doug Figgs, Ryan Fritz, Deanna McCall, and Michael Stevens. Saturday night headliners are Gary Allegretto, Ross Knox, Gary Robertson, Trinity Seely, and Caitlyn Taussig. Other poets and musicians include Apache Adams, Amy Hale Auker, Floyd Beard, “Straw” Berry, Mike Blakely, Teressa Burleson, Dale Burson, Don Cadden, Bob Campbell, Craig Carter, Cowboy Celtic, Allan Chapman & Rodeo Kate, Doris Daley, Mikki Daniel, John Davis, Kevin Davis, Ray Fitzgerald, Rolf Flake, Pipp Gillette, Jeff Gore, Kristyn Harris, Andy Hedges, Don Hedgpeth, Carol Heuchan, Yvonne Hollenbeck, Randy Huston, Chris Isaacs, Jill Jones & Three Hands High, Jim Jones, Linda Kirkpatrick, Daron Little, Pat Meade, Glenn Moreland, Terry Nash, Joel Nelson, Sam Noble, Kay Nowell, Jean Prescott, Gary Prescott, Mike Querner, Luke Reed, Randy Rieman, Heather Watson & Nathan Schmidt, R.P. Smith, Gail Steiger, Rod Taylor, Doug Tolleson, Keith Ward, Washtub Jerry, and Jim Wilson.

Find more at texascowboypoetry.com and on Facebook.

Find more about Jay Snider at CowboyPoetry.com and visit http://www.JaySnider.net.

This photo is by popular poet and wilderness guide Sandy Seaton Sallee, from December, 2015. She describes it, “Fred and Frank, our big blue Brabant/Percheron team, near our home above the Yellowstone River. Airedale pup Kate enjoyed the ride!” Sandy and her husband Scott run Black Mountain Outfitters, Inc., located in the heart of Paradise Valley, just north of Yellowstone National Park in Montana and also Slough Creek Outfitters, offering world-famous Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout fishing. Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at blackmountainoutfitters.com and at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

HORSE TRAINING 101 by Sandy Seaton Sallee

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photo © Sue Johnson; request permission for use

HORSE TRAINING 101
by Sandy Seaton Sallee

I was cruising through the want ads
Of the Mini Nickel rag
When I spied a real bargain
I ain’t talkin’ ’bout no nag

He’s a thoroughbred and Arab
With some walkin’ horse as well
Just a touch of Morgan breeding
And some Paso, too, to sell

A quarter part is quarter horse
A sixteenth Appy blood
With all those shining qualities
This horse could be my bud.

So I called the gal who owned him
This future dream of mine
He’s three, he’s green, he’s still a stud
But he’s priced one ninety-nine.

No, that’s not a misprint
This steed was good as bought
For just two hundred bucks, less change
A deal was what I got.

I brought young Lucky home that day
A wee bit hard to load
We couldn’t get him in the stocks
But how that fine horse towed!

It wasn’t far back to my place
Just as well for him
His feet wore down right to the quick
An automatic trim.

You might think that he’s no steal
You’ve always been a cynic
When I am through he’ll be a champ!
I’ll take him to a clinic.

For doubling my purchase price
We’d learn to trailer load
A couple hundred dollars more
This green horse could be rode!

A clinic then for round corrals
We circled ’til I’m dizzy
But how that horse can run that fence
He’s kept me real busy.

And then I paid to cut him
‘Fore I joined the cuttin’ class
He’s working cows in fine corrals
He’ll spin and slide and pass

But still he needs arena time
For just five hundred more
A week long barrel school for us
Just leaves me wanting more—

I’ll work two jobs! I’ll sell my truck
I’ve got to pay for schoolin’
A leading clinic, kicking clinic,
Striking, biting, that’s no foolin’—

I’ll train him not to run away
For just three hundred more
Penning clinic cost two fifty
But we’re smarter than before.

So many kinds of roping schools!
There’s calf, and ranch and team
Lucky and I took them all
We’re ropin’ like a dream.

We even did the “Vets on Pets”
I saved some money there!
It cost me some, but now I know
To give my horse home care.

A packin’ school! A doggin’ school!
There’s even one for mules
‘Course they won’t let ol’ Lucky in
Said we’d just look like fools.

Well, finally we hit them all
We’d clinic’d with the best
And I was proud my little horse
Had stood up to the test.

‘Tween clinics and the traveling
And troubles ‘long the way
I figured my investment then
Was just about to pay—

A stranger asked to buy my horse!
I sold him in a flash
‘Cause I DOUBLED what I’d paid for him
I got four hundred cash.

© Sandy Seaton Sallee
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Montana poet, horsewoman, and outfitter Sandy Seaton Sallee grew up in Yellowstone National Park, where she rode horseback among the elk and drove four-up stagecoaches. After cowboying in New Mexico, she returned to her native Montana where she met her future husband, Scott Sallee, in a wilderness hunting camp. Sandy and Scott now own and operate Black Mountain Outfitters, a wilderness and ranch outfitting business and Yellowstone trout fishing’s Slough Creek Outfitters, the only tent camp site permitted on Slough Creek in the Gallatin National Forest.

A frequent performer at cowboy poetry gatherings, she has a recent book, Magic Montana, which includes her words and photos by her and by Scott Sallee.

This photo of Sandy is by her sister, Sue Johnson.

Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at cowboypoetry.com.

MEMO ON MULES by S. Omar Barker (1895-1985)

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photo ©2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee; request permission for use

MEMO ON MULES
by S. Omar Barker (1895-1985)

There ain’t no use in talkin’,
When a feller rides a mule,
He’s got himself a saddle mount
That’s mighty hard to fool.
Some horses step right in a bog
without a second glance,
But jassacks simply don’t believe
in takin’ any chance.
They’ll fool around a barbed wire fence
the same as horses, but
You purt near never see a mule
that’s got a barbed-wire cut.
You let a horse get to the grain,
he’ll founder on the stuff,
But mules, by instinct, seem to know
when they have had enough.

Some mules will spook and run away,
some throw a buckin’ fit,
But panicky is something that
they seldom ever git,
For when they pull a ruckus,
they are always plumb alert
To see that Mr. Jackass
never winds up gittin’ hurt.

Most cowboys think a jassack
is a plumb disgraceful mount,
And it is true that some of them
ain’t very much account
For anything but harness
or to tote a heavy pack,
And horses have some virtues
that a mule may often lack;
But ol’ Kit Carson rode a mule,
and other pioneers
Sure viewed a heap of country
over some ol’ hard-tail’s ears.
And all of them reported that
upon the longest trail,
The mule was one tough critter
that was never knowed to fail.
He’d stay plumb fat on grass so short
a horse would starve to death.
He never lathered easy
and was seldom short of breath.
Kit claimed his gait was easy
on the rider in the kack,
And that he’d always git you there
and always bring you back.

This ain’t no fancy eulogy
on big-eared saddle mounts,
But some oldtimers rode ’em,
and by most of their accounts
Of jassacks under saddle,
in the smooth or in the rough,
There seems to be some evidence
that mules have got the stuff!

…by S. Omar Barker, from Rawhide Rhymes; used with the permission of the estate of S. Omar Barker

S. Omar Barker was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America, Inc. and many of his poems were published by Western Horseman.

It’s told that Barker enjoyed signing his name with his brand, created from his initials and the “S” laid sideways for “Lazy SOB,” but, that’s not a completely accurate story. In an article written by Barker for a March/April 1972 issue of Hoofs and Horns magazine, Barker introduces himself, “…This S.O.B. (my initials, not my ancestry) has never claimed to qualify as a sure ‘nough cowboy.” Later in the article, he comments, “Incidentally, when I applied for (Lazy S O B) for our cattle brand, they wrote back that some other S O B already had it. So we had to be satisfied with (Lazy S B).” (Thanks to Andy Hedges for sharing the article, which he received from Vess Quinlan, who received it from Joel Nelson who received it from Kay Kelley Nowell. We are still looking for the date.).

Find more about S. Omar Barker at CowboyPoetry.com.

This recent photo, which has had a viral popularity on Facebook, is by poet and wilderness guide Sandy Seaton Sallee, taken of her husband Scott riding a mule and leading 14 more out of their wilderness camp.

Sandy and Scott run Black Mountain Outfitters,  located in the heart of Paradise Valley, just north of Yellowstone National Park in Montana and also Slough Creek Outfitters, , offering world-famous Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout fishing. Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at blackmountainoutfitters.com and at CowboyPoetry.com.

Enjoy these additional photos from the Sallees:

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photo ©2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee; request permission for use

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photo ©2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee; request permission for use

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photo ©2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee; request permission for use

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photo ©2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee; request permission for use

RESOLUTION by Sandy Seaton Sallee

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RESOLUTION
by Sandy Seaton Sallee

I catapulted yesterday
Atop my brand new steed
We somersaulted off the hill
I didn’t even bleed.

Today I crept out of my bed
My tailbone’s in revolt
I ignored his warning signs
I’d by-gosh ride that colt!

Last year I led a spooky mule
Tied to a spotted App
The mule was calm but Appy ran
A fast Olympic lap.

Back corkscrewed but chiropractor
Got me cranked in place
No one could see the black-and-blue
‘Cept marks on my face.

Three surg’ries on my shoulders
The screws have been removed
A walking cast repaired my foot
My insurance approved.

I broke my neck while roping steers
That gelding sure could buck
I’m wired now from end to end
I’m tight with Lady Luck.

Both knees are orthoscopic-fixed
My right wrist has a pin
My skull sports quilted stitching marks
I have a crooked grin.

An old friend watched me limp one day
The words he said still lash
“Your mind is writing checks for you
Your body just can’t cash.”

Next time I’m sure I won’t buck off
I’ve discovered the solution
I’ll have no choice for now that goal’s
My New Year’s Resolution!

© 2017, Sandy Seaton Sallee, used with permission
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author’s permission.

Popular poet and wilderness guide Sandy Seaton Sallee shared a photo earlier this week, and it’s a pleasure to have one more poem about resolutions and another photo from her. She says the poem is, “All true, unfortunately!”

Sandy Seaton has just been named as the “Buck Ramsey Cowgirl Poet of the Year” by the Academy of Western Artists.

Sandy and her husband Scott run Black Mountain Outfitters, located in the heart of Paradise Valley, just north of Yellowstone National Park in Montana and also Slough Creek Outfitters, offering world-famous Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout fishing. Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at CowboyPoetry.com.

TYRONE AND TYREE by Jay Snider

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photo © 2016, Sandy Seaton Sallee

TYRONE AND TYREE
by Jay Snider

I’ve learned lots of lessons
’bout cowboyin’ up
’cause I’ve been a cowboy
since I was a pup

And my dad taught me
just like his dad taught him
rewards without effort
come seldom and slim

And if workin’ for wages
or bossin’ a crew
a job left half finished
reflects upon you

And good leaders of men
who while bossin’ the crew
won’t ask of their men
what they wouldn’t do

‘Cause men are just men
and it’s by God’s design
we all pull on our britches
one leg at a time

But some men are leaders
while others hold back
they stray off the trail
and are hard to untrack

But with proper persuasion
will likely fall in
’cause that’s just the nature
Of hosses and men

Which put me to thinkin’
’bout Tyrone and Tyree
the best team of Belgians
you ever did see

Why they’d lay in those collars
and pull stride for stride
work sunup to sundown
till the day that they died

But Tyree would get balky
not pull like he should
so Tyrone would reach over
and scold him right good

Then the load they were pullin’
would even right out
that’s the lesson in life
that I’m talkin’ about

‘Cause some hosses are leaders
while some will pull back
they’ll stray off the trail
and are hard to untrack

But with proper persuasion
will likely fall in
see, that’s just the nature
of hosses and men

Which put me to thinkin’
’bout what Dad had said
and a couple of visions
then danced in my head

In my mirror, while shavin’
which one will I see
could I be Tyrone
or would I be Tyree

And to leaders of men
let’s all raise a cup
here’s to pullin’ your weight
and to cowboyin’ up

© 2005, Jay Snider, used with permission
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author’s permission.

Here’s a poem that might inspire some New Year’s resolutions.

Popular Oklahoma rancher, poet, and songwriter Jay Snider is a crowd pleaser on stages across the West. He is appreciated as well for his fine reciting.

Jay Snider has a grand new CD, Classic Cowboy Poetry: The Old Tried and True, which showcases his fine reciting. Like some poetry time traveler, he delivers poems by Bruce Kiskaddon, Henry Herbert Knibbs, Will Ogilvie, Sunny Hancock, and others, to carry you back to time when, to quote Kiskaddon, “cattle were plenty and people were few.” Find more at http://www.jaysnider.net (and more about him and more poetry at CowboyPoetry.com).

Enjoy his rendition of Sunny Hancock’s (1931-2003) “The Bear Tale” in a video from the Western Folklife Center’s 2011 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

See a Western Horseman video about Jay Snider by Jennifer Denison here.

Just a few of the places you’ll find Jay Snider in coming months include: the 4th annual Western Music & Songwriters Series, January 28, 2017 in Tooele, Utah; the 31st Annual Texas Cowboy Poetry Gathering, February 24-25, 2017, in Alpine; and the Cochise Cowboy Poetry and Music Gathering, February 3-4, 2017, in Sierra Vista, Arizona.

Find more about Jay Snider at CowboyPoetry.com, and visit JaySnider.net.

This photo is by popular poet and wilderness guide Sandy Seaton Sallee, from December, 2015. She described it, “Fred and Frank, our big blue Brabant/Percheron team, near our home above the Yellowstone River. Airedale pup Kate enjoyed the ride!” Sandy and her husband Scott run Black Mountain Outfitters, located in the heart of Paradise Valley, just north of Yellowstone National Park in Montana and also Slough Creek Outfitters, offering world-famous Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout fishing. Find more about Sandy Seaton Sallee at CowboyPoetry.com, .