SONGS LESS TRAVELED by A.K.(Kathy) Moss

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SONGS LESS TRAVELED
by A.K.(Kathy) Moss

When I was young our dad would sing songs,
Of cowboys, horses and love gone wrong.
He’d take us back in time we would hear,
We rode along as he sang knowing he was near.

And we’d ride that Bad Brahma Bull, and the Chisholm Trail,
We went to Cowboy Heaven, tied a knot in the devils tail.
Rode that Strawberry Roan, wore that Continental Suit,
Heard the Jingle Jangle Jingle, saw the one the called The Brute.
We could hear the Coyotes Song and the Cattle Call.
Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle When the Works All Done This Fall.

When it was time for bed, or I was feeling low,
I would ask my dad to sing a song, a song of long ago
Before he would finish a smile would cross my face,
As we rode off together, another time another place.

And we’d ride that Bad Brahma Bull, and the Chisholm Trail,
We went to Cowboy Heaven, tied a knot in the devils tail.
Rode that Strawberry Roam, wore that Continental Suit,
Heard the Jingle Jangle Jingle, saw the one the called The Brute.
We would hear the Coyotes Song and the Cattle Call.
Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle When the Works All Done This Fall.

Now when I am traveling alone and there is nothing but time,
A tune come drifting in and gathers in my mind.
I hum along as those words are unraveled, then start singing a song, songs less travelled.

And I’d ride that Bad Brahma Bull, and the Chisholm Trail,
I’d go to Cowboy Heaven, tie a knot in the devils tail.
Ride that Strawberry Roan, wear that Continental Suit,
Heard the Jingle Jangle Jingle, see the one they called The Brute.
I’d hear the Coyotes Song and the Cattle Call.
Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle When the Works All Done This Fall.

Now times have changed from the wild west then
There is still a magic and a wonder of how it all had been.
So let those stories live and your imagination bring,
A distant memory as the cowboy sing.

And we’d ride that Bad Brahma Bull, and the Chisholm Trail,
We went to cowboy heaven, tied a knot in the devils tail.
Rode that Strawberry Roan, wore that Continental Suit,
Heard the Jingle Jangle Jingle, saw the one the called The Brute.
We would hear the Coyotes Song and the Cattle Call.
Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle When the Works All Done This Fall.

So hum along as those words are unraveled,
Then start singing a song, those songs less traveled.

© A.K. Moss
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Oregon’s Kathy moss comments, “This poem brings back memories of my dad when the radio didn’t work in the old ’63 Ford pickup with 6 kids packed in the cab with our mom. He would start singing word-for-word, never missed a beat. Two of his favorites were “Strawberry Roan” and “Say Hey Good Lookin'” by Hank Williams…great memories shared by so many.”

As varied as her own background—horsewoman, cowboy, poet, novelist, and more—Kathy Moss’s unique new CD, The Truth, presents diverse voices and moods in poems that speak of authentic experience and pay tribute to important influences in her life and work.

On half of the tracks, her original poetry is paired with the voices of other poets and singers. The voice of the late Georgie Sicking, an important inspiration, is heard on “Wink, Nod, and Sigh.” On the title poem, written for her friend Billie Flick, singer Joni Harms offers a complementary message to the title poem with her “Long Hard Ride.” A tribute to a another mentor, “Soft Spoken Man,” honors Joel Nelson and carries his voice, with words from his “The Breaker in the Pen” poem. Brenn Hill joins in on her “He’ll Never Ride Again” with his song “What a Man’s Got to Do.” The US Army Rangers and Wes Aasness chime in on “Partners.”

A tale worth hearing, “KT Diner,” carries on the story of Ian Tyson’s “Navajo Rug.” Kathy Moss’s distinctive voice with its storyteller charm infuses all of these poems.

The CD’s attractive package design is by Anita Crane. Find the CD at CDBaby or directly from Kathy Moss at akmoss12@gmail.com. Visit akmossbooks.com for more.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem with this post, but for other uses, request permission.)