Christmas Cowboy Poetry: The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Eight

…Some say he was born in the snow an’ the cold,
yeller an’ white with a heart made of gold.
His mom was part Angus his dad was a polled
Hereford I hear (er so I been told)…
…from DW Groethe’s “The Legend of Little Buddy the Christmas Steer

 

xmas13cdbanner

 

The perfect gift, The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Eight is a two-disc celebration of the best classic and contemporary Christmas cowboy poetry.

Opening the collection is a beautiful rendition of the shaped-note “Christmas Waltz” by National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellow, cowboy, poet, and musician Buck Ramsey (1938-1998), accompanied by his sisters and brother. In two of the many recordings made for this release, great cowboy troubadour Don Edwards recites Badger Clark’s “The Christmas Trail” and top cowboy poet Waddie Mitchell offers his original “Good Gift.” Red Steagall , past Texas Poet Laureate and the state’s official cowboy poet delivers S. Omar Barker’s “Three Wise Men” and the voice of Jimmy Dean (1928-2010) is heard in a vintage recording of S. Omar Barker’s “A Cowboy’s Christmas Prayer.” There are 48 tracks in total.

The real “Little Buddy,” featured on the cover, is at the Granley Ranch near Bainville, Montana. The image was created by designer Chris Waddell from a photograph by Montana ranch hand, poet, and picker DW Groethe.

Print

buynowx

Available for $25 postpaid in the US ($35 international)
Click above for credit card payments, or mail to CowboyPoetry.com,
PO Box 1107, Lexington, VA 24450

The image was also the subject of a Christmas Art Spur, where you can also read DW Groethe’s entire poem.

CDs are given to libraries as a part of Cowboy Poetry Week’s Rural Library Program. They are also thank-you premiums for supporters. Proceeds from CDs offered to the public are used for the next year’s compilation and the Rural Library Program.

We’ll be sharing more poems from The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Eight during this year’s 20th annual Christmas at the BAR-D.

Every year’s CD includes a radio public service announcement about the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry. For this CD, it is delivered by ranch-raised rodeo broadcaster Totsie Slover.

The BAR-D Roundup cover images are usually vintage photos of poets or their forebears. This special Christmas collection veers slightly from that tradition with a photo of “Little Buddy” a steer from the Granley Ranch near Bainville, Montana (thanks to poet, picker, and ranch hand DW Groethe). Inside is a photograph of the annual live Nativity at Dick Noble and Jim and Tina Noble Nelson’s Flying U Ranch, in Cora, Wyoming.

nativity2013

Find more about the Christmas CD at CowboyPoetry.com.

There were ten volumes of The BAR-D Roundup. The current series is MASTERS.

MASTERS CD Series

 The Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry produces compilation CDs of classic and contemporary poetry recitations. The CDs are offered to libraries in the Center’s Cowboy Poetry Week Rural Library project, given as premiums to the Center’s supporters, and available to the public.

The current CD series is MASTERS.

Coming in 2020:  MASTERS: VOLUME FOUR, the poetry of Badger Clark.

bwseparator

kiskv3mastersx

MASTERS: VOLUME THREE contains over 60 tracks in a three-disc CD of the poetry of  Bruce Kiskaddon. Voices from the past and from today’s top reciters and poets celebrate cowboy poetry’s popular classic poet.  Kiskaddon expert Bill Siems introduces the CD.

Find more about MASTERS: VOLUME THREE here.

bwseparator

2018_MastersCD_Cover_700X700 (2)

MASTERS: VOLUME TWO (April, 2018) contains over 60 tracks in a double CD of the poetry of S. Omar Barker. Many of today’s top reciters and poets—including individuals,  siblings, couples, parents and children—bring forth Barker’s humor and humanity. Andy Hedges introduces the CD.

Find more about MASTERS: VOLUME TWO here.

bwseparator

masters6

The first CD in the series. MASTERS (2017), includes the works of Larry McWhorter, J.B. Allen, Sunny Hancock, and Ray Owens, reciting their poetry in recorded poems, “live” performances, and their recitations of other masters’ works (Buck Ramsey, S. Omar Barker, and Henry Herbert Knibbs). Jay Snider introduces the CD.

Find more about MASTERS (2017) here.

bwseparator

cd7
Previous to the MASTERS series, the Center produced ten volumes of The BAR-D Roundup.

bwseparator

CPW_Cameron_Poster_2019_R1

The Center’s Cowboy Poetry Week celebration—recognized by unanimous U.S. Senate resolution—is held each April during National Poetry Month. Each year, a compilation CD and the celebration’s poster—by Shawn Cameron in 2019; by Clara Smith in 2018; by Jason Rich in 2017; by Gary Morton in 2016; by Don Dane in 2015; by Jason Rich in 2014; Shawn Cameron in 2013; by R.S. Riddick in 2012, Duward Campbell in 2011, Bill Owen in 2010, Bob Coronato in 2009; William Matthews in 2008; Tim Cox in 2007; and Joelle Smith in 2006—are offered to libraries in the Center’s Rural Library Project. The outreach program is a part of the Center’s commitment to serve rural communities and to preserve and promote our Western heritage.

We need your support to continue and expand these programs. Join us and be a part of it all.

 

THANKSGIVING, Charles Badger Clark

badgerthanks2019

THANKSGIVING
by Charles Badger Clark (1883-1957)

Accept my thanks today, O Lord—
But not so much for bed and board—
Those stodgy items of good cheer
I share with chipmunks and with deer—
But rather gifts more fine and fair
That come upon me unaware.

Those priceless incidental things—
Flower fragrance and bird flutterings,
The sudden laughter often caught
From some fantastic kink of thought
A pine’s black fretwork lifted high
Against the tranquil sunset sky,

Kindness from strangers all unnamed
That makes me wholesomely ashamed,
A friend’s warm, understanding eyes,
A book’s communion with the wise,
The dreamful magic of a tune
And slim white birches in the moon—
I thank you, Lord, for daily bread
But I am so much more than fed,
For you, with nought deserved or won,
Indulge me like a favored son,
Flinging profuse along my ways
These jeweled things that deck the day
And make my living far more sweet
Than just to breathe or just to eat.

…by Charles Badger Clark

Happy Thanksgiving, all!

South Dakota native Charles Badger Clark worked as a ranch hand in Arizona ranch and became the first South Dakota Poet Laureate. His father was a minister; his poems often express gratitude. “A Cowboy’s Prayer” is the best known. This one is likewise full of grace. Find more at cowboypoetry.com.

This photo is of Badger Clark and his friend and fellow poet, Bob Axtel (1887-1976). The photo, by Charles Axtel, is from Arizona historian Greg Scott’s Cowboy Poetry, Classic Poems & Prose by Badger Clark. The book includes all of Badger Clark’s short stories; poetry, including more than two dozen previously unpublished or long out-of-print poems; essays; letters; and photos. See our feature about the book and another about Axtel.

The South Dakota Historical Society Foundation holds Badger Clark’s papers and offers his books for sale.

We’re at work on a new cd, MASTERS: VOLUME FOUR, the poetry of Charles Badger Clark. Find more about MASTERS here.

Find Thanksgiving poems and more at CowboyPoetry.com.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and photo with this post. The poem is in the public domain. Request permission for any other use of the photo.)

MASTERS: VOLUME THREE, the poetry of Bruce Kiskaddon

kiskv3mastersx

photo of Bruce Kiskaddon licensed from the Aultman Collection, History Colorado

“We are so very fortunate that the Center For Western and Cowboy Poetry / CowboyPoetry.com even exists, but particularly because [they] annually issue performances of the most revered classic Cowboy Poetry as part of their MASTERS series, making them available to libraries and learning institutions.  Staring out from the cover of MASTERS: VOLUME THREE is the strikingly handsome face of the young Bruce Kiskaddon, one of the most personally accomplished, admired and often performed Cowboy Poets of all time.  Here you have three CDs packed with fifty-eight Kiskaddons they somehow culled from among his nearly five hundred poems.  Most of the fine reciters chosen for the release are recognized poets in the own rights from current times and the past.  As always, great consideration has been given to the flow from work to work on the CDs, making the collection all the more enjoyable.  If you are not already Kiskaddon-oriented, let this opportunity immerse you in what it really is to be—and see through the eyes and feel with the heart of—a cowboy.  Highly recommended.” Rick Huff, Rick Huff’s Best of the West Reviews

“These CDs are historic collections that will be appreciated for generations to come.” Charley Engel, “Chuckaroo the Buckaroo” of Calling All Cowboys radio

Praise for previous CDs from CowboyPoetry.com:

“The MASTERS of cowboy poetry series from CowboyPoetry.com showcases both the masters of writing Western poetic words and masters of delivering those words.  It just doesn’t get any better than that.” Rick Huff, Rick Huff’s Best of the West Reviews

“This album [MASTERS (2017)] represents four of the finest poets to ever come out of cowboy culture. We are not likely to see their kind again and the world should be grateful to Cowboypoetry.com for preserving their voices.” Andy Hedges, songster and host of COWBOY CROSSROADS

“…The annual anthology takes listeners on an oral excursion to places throughout the West, introducing them to colorful cowboy characters, explaining their connection to the land, and telling their tales of tough times and the rewards they receive from living the Western lifestyle…” Jennifer Denison, Senior Editor, Western Horseman

“The Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry’s annual anthologies are creating a valuable, high quality and thoroughly enjoyable resource for everyone…” Steve Green, Archivist, Western Folklife Center

“…without peer…intelligently produced… I equate them to one of those Ken Burns specials, like his Civil War, Jazz, or Baseball….the best of the best.” Rick Huff, Rick Huff’s Best of the West Reviews

“For those of us who love cowboy poetry, this is perhaps the best anthology we’ve yet heard.” Cowboy Magazine

The Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry produces compilation CDs of classic and contemporary poetry recitations. The CDs are offered to libraries in the Center’s Cowboy Poetry Week Rural Library project, given as premiums to the Center’s supporters, and available to the public.

kiskv3mastersx

Our thirteenth CD (following ten volumes of The BAR-D Roundup and two MASTERS volumes) is MASTERS: VOLUME THREE, the poetry of Bruce Kiskaddon (April 2019).

MASTERS: VOLUME THREE has over 60 tracks in a multi-disc CD of the poetry of Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950). Voices from the past and from today’s top reciters and poets celebrate cowboy poetry’s popular classic poet. Bill Siems, whose monumental work, Open Range, collects almost all of Kiskaddon’s nearly 500 poems, introduces the CD.

Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)  worked for ten years as a cowboy, starting in 1898 in southeastern Colorado’s Picketwire area. He published short stories and nearly 500 poems. His poems are among the most admired and the most recited in the “classic” cowboy poetry canon.

Find more about Kiskaddon at CowboyPoetry.com.

The MASTERS CD is dedicated to all those who proudly carry on the ranching tradition.

CPW_Cameron_Poster_2019_R1

The Center’s Cowboy Poetry Week celebration—recognized by unanimous U.S. Senate resolution—takes place each April during National Poetry Month. Each year, a compilation CD and the celebration’s poster (by Shawn Cameron in 2019) have been offered to libraries in the Center’s Rural Library Program. The outreach program is part of the Center’s commitment to serve rural communities and to preserve and promote our Western heritage.

The annual CD is a premium for our supporters and also available for purchase. Find information about past years’ CDs here.

We need your support to continue and expand these programs. Join us and be a part of it all.

bwseparator

Order information

The MASTERS CD  is available for $35 postpaid. Order with a credit card at Paypal or by mail:  CowboyPoetry.com, Box 1107, Lexington, VA 24450.

buynow

bwseparator

Below:

Track list and description
Acknowledgements

bwseparator

The over 60 tracks on three CDs begin with an biographical introduction to Bruce Kiskaddon by Bill Siems, whose monumental work, Open Range, collects almost all of Kiskaddon’s nearly 500 poems.

The poetry begins with some of the best known of Kiskaddon’s reflective poems, with a look backward to “when cattle were plenty and men were few.” Then poems that follow are, somewhat in this order: about cowboys and men; work; cattle; horses (and one mule); heavenly concerns; times gone by; quirky characters; gear; a ghost tale; and a few Christmas poems. Musician and top sound engineer Butch Hause offers a colorful radio PSA for the Center and Cowboy Poetry Week.

kiskv3mastersx

DISC ONE

1. ABOUT BRUCE KISKADDON Bill Siems
2. from LOOKING BACKWARD Randy Rieman
3. WHEN THEY’VE FINISHED SHIPPING CATTLE IN THE FALL Randy Rieman
4. THE BRONCHO TWISTER’S PRAYER Jay Snider
5. THE TIME TO DECIDE Andy Hedges
6. THE CREAK OF THE LEATHER Gary McMahan
7. ALONE Trey Allen (1971-2016)
8. AFTER THE FALL ROUNDUP Floyd Beard
9. BETWEEN THE LINES Jay Snider
10. THE DRIFTER Ol’ Jim Cathey
11. HE DIDN’T BELONG Rod Miller
12. IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ME OR IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN YOU Ken Cook
13. THE LONG EARED BULL Ross Knox
14. THE OLD NIGHT HAWK Chris Isaacs
15. THE NEW MEXICO STRAY Dennis Russell
16. MICROBES Jerry Brooks
17. STARTIN’ OUT Gail Steiger
18. COW SENSE Deanna Dickinson McCall
19. THE COW AND THE CALF Amy Hale Auker
20. NOT SO SLOW Jessica Hedges
21. SHOVELING THE ICE OUT OF THE TROUGH Robert Dennis
22. THE LONG HORN SPEAKS Valerie Beard

DISC TWO

1. INTRODUCTORY Ken Cook
2. EARLY WORM Keith Ward
3. RIDIN’ FENCE Gail Steiger
4. FEEDIN’ TIME John Reedy
5. THEY CAN TAKE IT Baxter Black
6. THAT LITTLE BLUE ROAN J.B. Allen (1938-2005)
7. THE BELL MARE Brigid Reedy
8. FORGOTTEN Jesse Smith
9. WHEN YOU’RE THROWED Randy Rieman
10. WHEN HE COLD JAWS Duane Nelson
11. CAUGHT NAPPIN’ Keith Ward
12. PULLIN’ LEATHER Gary McMahan
13. ON FOOT Kathy Moss
14. HER COLT Susie Knight
15. THE ARMY MULE Kay Kelley Nowell
16. THE GENTLE HOSS Tom Swearingen
17. THE OLD COW PONY Dick Morton
18. WHEN CONNORS RODE REP FOR THE LORD Ross Knox
19. JUDGMENT DAY DW Groethe
20. THE COW BOY’S DREAM Waddie Mitchell

DISC THREE

1. AN OLD WESTERN TOWN Randy Rieman
2. THE MEDICINE SHOW Andy Hedges
3. THEN AND NOW Andy Nelson
4. PROGRESS Dale Page
5. THE BRANDIN’ CORRAL Almeda Bradshaw
6. AUGERIN’ Smoke Wade
7. THE MAN ON THE FENCE Bill Siems
8. A COWBOY’S BRAINS Sunny Hancock (1931-2003)
9. DRINKIN’ WATER Jarle Kvale
10. WET BOOTS Johnny Reedy
11. ALKALI IKE’S ZIPPERS Rusty McCall (1986-2013)
12. WORKIN’ IT OVER David McCall
13. THE LOST FLANNINS Terry Nash
14. HER MAN Susie Knight
15. GHOST CANYON TRAIL Rex Rideout

CHRISTMAS POEMS
16. CHRISTMAS AT THE HOME RANCH Keith Ward
17. THE OLD TIME CHRISTMAS Linda Kirkpatrick
18. MERRY CHRISTMAS (1933) Gail Steiger

19. CENTER FOR WESTERN AND COWBOY POETRY RADIO PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT (PSA) Butch Hause

bwseparator

Thanks to the poets, reciters, and families and to Bill Siems, Andy Hedges, Margaret Allen, Jeffrey Hancock, the McCall family, the Western Folklife Center, the Cowboy Crossroads podcast, History Colorado, Andy Nelson and Clear Out West (C.O.W.) radio, Totsie Slover and The Real West from the Old West radio, and Chris Kirby. Produced by Margo Metegrano and compiled and mastered by Butch Hause at the Ranger Station Studio, Berthoud, Colorado, all with generous funding support from Laura and Edmund Wattis Littlefield, Jr., the Margaret T. Morris Foundation, and our community’s all-important sustaining donors.

Photograph of Bruce Kiskaddon licensed from the Aultman Collection, History Colorado.

WORKIN’ IT OVER, by Bruce Kiskaddon

holding

 

WORKIN’ IT OVER
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

It don’t matter much what a cow boy may own,
You never can git him to leave it alone.
He always has some fool idee in his head,
‘Bout his saddle or pack outfit, even his bed.

Supposin’ his saddle is made with square skirts.
It worries that waddie ontil his soul hurts.
He gits out his knife and he cuts the skirts round;
Then he stitches the edges, or laces ’em down.

Then, mebby he’ll cut the chafes off from his cinches.
He will splice out some straps or cut off a few inches.
He will cut at his pack outfit and rip out the stitchin’
While he changes the breast rig or mebby the britchin’.

He will whittle his bridle, and ‘fore he gets through,
He has got both his spur straps cut half way in two.
When his outfit’s plum ruint he goes to the store;
He buys some new stuff and starts whittlin’ once more.

…by Bruce Kiskaddon

This poem appeared in the Western Livestock Journal in September, 1940, and also was in the Los Angeles Union Stockyards calendar.

We are pleased to have a recitation of this poem by David McCall on the forthcoming 3-CD MASTERS: VOLUME THREE, the poetry of Bruce Kiskaddon, to be released in late April for Cowboy Poetry Week. Voices from the past and from today’s top reciters and poets celebrate cowboy poetry’s popular classic poet.

NEW: See the track list for the three CDs.

You can receive a CD and the Cowboy Poetry Week Poster for a donation of $50 or more to the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry. Find more and a quick link for donating here.

CDs will likely be $35 postpaid. Posters are never sold.

According to Bill Siems’ Open Range, which includes almost all of Kiskaddon’s nearly 500 poems, Frank M. King wrote of Kiskaddon and calls him a “natural” as well. He comments, “Bruce is an old cowhand who just naturally thinks in rhymes. He never took no poem lessons, nor for that matter not many of any other sort of lessons, but he’s got ’em all tied to a snubbin’ post when it comes to building cowboy and range poetry…”

Find more about Kiskaddon in our features at CowboyPoetry.com.

This postcard, from our collection, is by artist J. Richard Parry (1883-1952). It’s titled “Holding My Own” is has a 1907 copyright (now in the public domain) and the reverse has a 1910 postmark. We don’t know much about Parry. He illustrated a book “The Mystery of Bonanza Trail” (1910). Searching genealogy records, we find his full name was John Richard Parry, born in 1883 to Elizabeth and John Parry, in Denver. In 1940, his profession is listed as “salesman” in the machinist industry. He died at age 69 and is buried in Wheat Ridge Cemetery, Jefferson County, Colorado.

This poem is in the public domain.

THAT LITTLE BLUE ROAN, by Bruce Kiskaddon

blueroanx.jpg

THAT LITTLE BLUE ROAN
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

Most all of you boys have rode horses like that.
He wasn’t too thin but he never got fat.
The old breed that had a moustache on the lip;
He was high at the wethers and low at the hip.
His ears always up, he had wicked bright eyes
And don’t you furgit he was plenty cow wise.

His ears and his fets and his pasterns was black
And a stripe of the same run the length of his back.
Cold mornin’s he’d buck, and he allus would kick
No hoss fer a kid or a man that was sick.
But Lord what a bundle of muscle and bone;
A hoss fer a cow boy, that little blue roan.

For afternoon work or for handlin’ a herd,
He could turn any thing but a lizzard or bird.
For ropin’ outside how that cuss could move out.
He was to ’em before they knowed what ’twas about.
And runnin’ down hill didn’t faize him aytall.
He was like a buck goat and he never did fall.

One day in the foot hills he give me a break
He saved me from makin’ a awful mistake,
I was ridin’ along at a slow easy pace,
Takin’ stock of the critters that used in that place,
When I spied a big heifer without any brand.
How the boys ever missed her I don’t onderstand.
Fer none of the stock in that country was wild,
It was like takin’ candy away from a child.

She never knowed jest what I had on my mind
Till I bedded her down on the end of my twine.
I had wropped her toes up in an old hoggin’ string,
And was buildin’ a fire to heat up my ring.
I figgered you see I was there all alone
Till I happened to notice that little blue roan.

That hoss he was usin’ his eyes and his ears
And I figgered right now there was somebody near.
He seemed to be watchin’ a bunch of pinon,
And I shore took a hint from that little blue roan.

Instead of my brand, well, I run on another.
I used the same brand that was on the calf’s mother.
I branded her right pulled her up by the tail
With a kick in the rump for to make the brute sail.
I had branded her proper and marked both her ears,
When out of the pinions two cow men appears.

They both turned the critter and got a good look
While I wrote the brand down in my own tally book.
There was nothin to do so they rode up and spoke
And we all three set down fer a sociable smoke.
The one owned the critter I’d happened to brand,
He thanked me of course and we grinned and shook hands
Which he mightn’t have done if he only had known
The warnin’ I got from that little blue roan.

…by Bruce Kiskaddon, 1947, from Rhymes of the Ranges

 

A couple of weeks ago, we included a 1938 note from the editor of the Western Livestock Journal, who stated that of Kiskaddon’s poems at the time, “Probably his ‘Little Blue Roan’ is the most popular.”

In his monumental collection of Bruce Kiskaddon’s poems (nearly 500), Open Range, editor Bill Siems also includes an earlier version of this poem, from Kiskaddon’s 1935 book, Western Poems.

Siems writes about the poet, “Kiskaddon first worked with cattle and horses as a youngster in Missouri, but dated his start as a buckaroo to 1898, when at age nineteen he began taking entry-level jobs at ranches along the Purgatory River east of Trinidad [Colorado], in the district called Picket Wire, from the cowboy pronunciation of Purgatoire, the original name of the river. Early on he discovered an affinity for horses and an aptitude for working with them. He honed his equine skills by taking jobs with horsemen who were willing to teach him, and became known as a rough string rider in an era when such skill was highly respected. Driven by an appetite for travel that grew with the passing years, Kiskaddon wandered farther from home through a succession of cowboy jobs during the next several years, until a serious accident around 1906 left him temporarily unable to ride.”

J.B. Allen’s recitation of “That Little Blue Roan” will be included on our forthcoming MASTERS: VOLUME THREE multi-disc CD of Bruce Kiskaddon’s poems, to be released in April for the 18th annual Cowboy Poetry Week. Find more about the MASTERS series here.

Find more in the Kiskaddon features at CowboyPoetry.com.

This 2005 photograph, titled “Two Young Nakota Mares,” is by François Marchal and is from Wikimedia Commons.

The poem is in the public domain.

COLD MORNIN’S, by Bruce Kiskaddon

coldmorninsyh

COLD MORNIN’S
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

I been out in the weather since I was a boy,
But cold mornin’s is sumthin’ a man cain’t enjoy.
It makes me feel like I wanted to quit
When I ketch up my pony and thaw out my bit.

There ain’t any cow puncher needs to be told
That my saddle is stiff and the leather is cold.
The blankets is froze and the hoss shakes like jelly
When you the pull the old frozen cinch up on his belly.

He snorts and he’s got a mean look in the eye.
He is humped till the back of the saddle stands high.
He ain’t in no humor to stand fer a joke,
But I belt on my chaps and I light me a smoke.

There may be some trouble between me and him.
It is like goin’ into cold water to swim.
It gives me a sort of shivver and scare
But once I git started; well then I don’t care.

…by Bruce Kiskaddon, 1937

Kiskaddon has a number of cold weather poems, no doubt inspired by his cowboying years in Colorado. This poem appeared in the “Western Livestock Journal” and on the Los Angeles Union Stockyards calendar.

Find more about Bruce Kiskaddon at CowboyPoetry.com.

This photograph is from top cowboy poet, South Dakota rancher, and quilt champion Yvonne Hollenbeck. It was taken a few years ago, and she commented, “Ahh, the life of a ranchwife in South Dakota in winter. We just scooped two long lines of bunks (wet heavy snow) so we could feed the calves…That was just half of ’em in the picture. We feed ground feed into the bunks. I think there’s two rows of 11.”

Yvonne is headed to the Western Folklife Center’s 35th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, January 28-February 2, 2019 in Elko, Nevada. Find more at nationalcowboypoetrygathering.org.

Find more about Yvonne Hollenbeck at cowboypoetry.com and at yvonnehollenbeck.com.

Stay tuned for our forthcoming MASTERS: VOLUME THREE multi-disc CD with the poems of Bruce Kiskaddon. Find more about the MASTERS series here.

(You can share this photo with this post, but please request permission for other uses. The poem is in the public domain.)