ART SPUR “Cows,” Winter 2019-2020

cowsjlk.jpg© 2017, Jo Lynne Kirkwood, request permission for use

Our 51st piece offered to “spur” the imagination is a special Winter/Christmas Art Spur, a 2017 drawing titled “Cows,” by Utah teacher, poet, artist, and storyteller Jo Lynne Kirkwood. In Art Spur, poets and songwriters are invited to let selections of Western art inspire their poetry and songs.

Art Spur submissions may be Winter- or Christmas-themed. All Christmas poems (Art Spur or not) were welcome through December 19, 2019. Winter-themed Art Spur poems are welcome through Tuesday, January 14, 2020. Selected poems will be posted. Find submission information below.

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POEMS

Winter

TOFURKY, ANYONE? by Marleen Bussma
FEEDIN’ THE COWS IN WINTER TIME by George Rhoades
A LONG WINTER by Jean Mathisen Haugen
NO BLUES IN COWTOWN by Jeff Campbell

Christmas

CATTLE AT CHRISTMAS (or) Homage to Fake News
by Jo Lynne Kirkwood
A TRUE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS by Michelle Turner
A CHRISTMAS MEMORY by Ol’ Jim Cathey

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TOFURKEY, ANYONE?
by Marleen Bussma

The climate changers warn you that the burger you might eat
will bring on rack and ruin so they’re cooking up fake meat.
Their laboratory’s stocked with many plant-based additives
to mimic looks and tastes of eats a cow creates and gives.

Misleading information doesn’t spell out all the facts.
Broad claims of harm from methane-spouting cows stalls and distracts
attention from the calorie laden, salty, processed goop.
This truth about fake food could make approval ratings droop.

The real world holds your cattle that you’ve raised just like your dad.
Tradition means a lot to you in this life that you’ve had.
So few now feed the masses, there’s an easy disconnect
from people in the city whose views aren’t always correct.

Your stomach has been growling since you finished feeding hay.
The wind has hurled and spit snow, adding misery to your day.
You’re headed into town and take time to enjoy the drive,
decide you’ll treat yourself at your kids’ fav’rite burger dive.

You pull up to the drive-thru and your mouth begins to drool.
She’s coming to the window with your take-out bag of fuel
and glides with sweet slow motion as in wild romantic dreams.
Her warm hand brushes yours as she hands out this sack that steams

with an aroma sending hot delicious sweet bouquets.
Unwrapped, it snaps a visual like a Polaroid display.
It’s stacked high to your liking with the layers snuggled neat.
The lettuce and tomato flirt like girls who work the street.

The bun’s soft to your fingers. Tiny drops of burger fat
drop down onto the open wrapper with a sensual splat.
You ease the burger upward. The aroma makes you weak.
Your mouth has flooded and drips when you open wide to seek

that burger high. Each bite sends out endorphins to your brain.
You sink into your seat as senses sing a glad refrain.
The flavor, texture, glistening shine of grease all join the choir
and work in harmony that sates the pleasure you desire.

They’re welcome to their fake food and their dirty city air.
You’ll take your country living that has cattle, where you share
the mountain views and pastures, soaring eagles in the sky.
Today you’re at the drive-thru to enjoy that burger high.

© 2020, Marleen Bussma
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

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FEEDIN’ THE COWS IN WINTER TIME
by George Rhoades

Icy wind, a little snow and sleet,
And the frost was like frozen dew
On those wintry days long ago
When there were feedin’ chores to do.

The southern plains all around us,
Rollin’ hills, horizons far, far away,
Chilly air cut just like a knife,
Trees along the creek bare and gray.

No hay racks out on the prairie,
No big round rolls back then;
We bucked square bales by hand,
Totin’ and hoistin’ ’em again and again.

Me and Pop would load the flatbed
With bales piled straight and high,
Cross the bridge to the cattle-guard
Under a bleak and cloudy sky.

Cows’d come runnin’ from the woods,
They knew every clatter and rattle
That old truck made on hayin’ days
When we came to feed the cattle.

Pop slowly, carefully drove the flatbed
While I tossed bales to the ground,
Pulled off the wires, broke ’em apart,
And spread the hay all around.

The cows cleaned up every bite,
Along with scattered cubes, I recall,
And we’d watch ’em chompin’ away,
Shovin’, pushin’ in a feedin’ free-for-all.

We’d break the ice on the ponds,
It seems like it was only yesterday,
Fix some fence and stretch some wire,
Check for new-borns, haul some hay.

Now a wind that’s sharp and cold
Brings once more to my mind’s eye
Memories of when me and Pop
Fed the cows in times gone by.

© 2020, George Rhoades
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

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A LONG WINTER
by Jean Mathisen Haugen

This winter started in October—
now snow is half-way up my horse,
while riding out to check the cattle—
it’s a real chore of course.
the pickup bucks over all the snow drifts
and rattles and bangs on its way.
I’d rather be drinking eggnog
on this cold New Year’s Day.
I have a thermos of coffee
packed there in my saddle bag.
Think I’ll stop by the grove of aspen
and have myself a drag.
The cattle all are bunched up
near that aspen grove,
keeping warm together,
though it’s not where we drove—
we’d cleared some of the meadow
and had a team and sleigh,
to bring them out some “eats”—
a large good load of hay.
There are clouds over the mountains,
another storm is headed in.
And Josh is looking closely looking
back at me with a grin.
He knows very well
that I am going to complain.
But snow is prettier I guess
than mud and slush and rain.
So here is a winter wish
to all you folks out there.
Keep warm and safe as you can
in the cold, long winter air!

© 2020, Jean Mathisen Haugen
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

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NO BLUES IN COWTOWN
by Jeff Campbell

Christmas  comes 

With great anticipation 

Followed up with a 

New Year Celebration

Then it’s back to work 

And school’s in session

Some folks end up with

Post holiday depression

Dad used to call it 

Old Jan-u-weary

The Skies are grey

People are bleary

But here in Fort Worth 

We don’t get the blues 

January’s something 

We all look forward to

For a legendary event 

Will be starting soon

With a big parade 

On Saturday afternoon

Over three weeks 

Where the West begins

They’ll be thrills and spills

Loses and wins

Cause everyday 

There’s  a big stock show

And come every night 

The grand rodeo

Wild bull riders 

Barrel racers too

Rabbits, pigeons 

and a petting zoo

Mariachis, fiddlers 

Guitar slingers

Cowboy poets 

Western singers

So if you’re near 

or if you’re far

Hop a plane, train 

Drive your car

Cause having the blues 

Can be such a pity 

We’ll see you soon 

In Panther City

© 2020, Jeff Campbell
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

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CHRISTMAS SELECTIONS

CATTLE AT CHRISTMAS (or) Homage to Fake News
by Jo Lynne Kirkwood

The legend that beasts on Christmas Eve can speak in human voice
To tell the tale of the Christ Child’s birth, so all Creation may rejoice
Has passed through generations, from those who witnessed first
The donkey, sheep, and cattle, bow down at the Infant’s birth.

And who could ever argue the veracity of that story?
Told by shepherds, with Angels standing guard, and Kings in all their glory?
Even the humble Drummer Boy, with a child’s sweet honesty
Sang praise to the musical Ox and Lamb, of their rhythmical harmony.

And though perhaps the Drummer’s ballad was a wordless lullaby,
The connections of cadence and human speech can hardly be denied.
So having admitted the evidence, my mind ponders, and keeps playing
With the thought, If cattle talk on Christmas Eve, What is it that they’re saying?

My faith compels me to believe, with original intent
Of this gift, to spread Glad Tidings! it was first used as was meant.
But twice a thousand years have passed since that Holy Night and now,
And credibility no longer loves a Missionary Cow.

What ever do they talk about? What could it be they say?
Could we suppose a diatribe on the quality of hay?
Perhaps they’d like a warmer barn, fewer barbs on barbed wire fence.
Do they laugh at us behind our backs? Make jokes at our expense?

Perhaps they plot a Range War, with human elocution.
They could be planning a coup d’état, a bovine revolution!
I pause to view the calendar, to count each day and week
Until this fateful night returns – When beasts again will speak!

Paranoia settles in. There will be Reindeer on the roof!
They’ve likely formed a spy network, tapping codes with each small hoof.
We must plan with watchful vigilance; Grab our Bibles, and our Guns,
To withstand the horned and hooved assault! And then, when daylight comes,

We’ll welcome Christmas Morning, share gifts and sing of Peace,
And Celebrate the Season with a haunch of Prime Roast Beef.

© 2017, Jo Kirkwood
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

cowsjlk.jpg

A TRUE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS
by Michelle Turner

The year, as a whole, was one to forget
Hardship and weather sent farmers in debt
Endless spring rains put planting on hold
Haybines were useless, equipment was sold

Much of our cropland left fallow and bare
Some covered with rye ‘cuz pasture was spare
Cattle were gleaning the few stubbled fields
Grain bins were empty from low harvest yields
Fall was no better with October snow
Corn was still standing as we hung mistletoe
Dad sat by the window, just shaking his head
We needed more hay for the stock to be fed

He put on his coat, stepping out in the cold
Sighing deeply he said, “The herd must be sold.”
A cow and two heifers stood by the gate
Patiently waiting, unaware of their fate

After chores we all left for Christmas Eve service
Our spirits were low, but we prayed with a purpose
Waylayed by the Pastor, delaying retreat
He saw in our faces a shadowed defeat

A message of hope, he shared so sincere
using God’s word to subdue our fears
The church yard now empty, we got in our truck
Riding in silence, still praying for luck

We drove down our lane and stopped at the sight
The whole congregation, holding candles of light
They sang Peace on Earth and gathered around
One neighbor came forward, “We’re here with some ground”

“We’ve forty-two acres, with hot-wire fencing
We want you to use it, with everyone’s blessing.”
Another stepped up, taking Dad by the arm
There’s third cutting hay, all stacked in your barn

Dad openly wept, sharing tears with the crowd
We formed a tight circle, hands held and heads bowed
Thanking the Lord for neighborly kindness;
For having been blessed with a true Country Christmas

© 2019, Michele Turner
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

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A CHRISTMAS MEMORY
by Ol’ Jim Cathey

Comin’ daybreak, the girls stood there,
They were ready for mornin’ feed.
Fog an’ snow made for crispy air,
Soon he’d come to meet their need.

There’d been a sifting of powder snow,
That had fell throughout the night.
T’was cold, but not unseasonable tho,
As dark gives in to mornin’ light.

Christmas morn on the Quarter Circle C,
But there was chores to get done,
Foggy an’ white made it hard to see,
This mornin’, they’d not see the sun.

Still a few flakes of snow in the air,
The girls were patient, standin’ quiet,
They knew the feed would be there,
An’ their day would start off right.

He smiled as they walked up slow,
Their breathe steamin’ from the cold,
He thought of a time so long ago,
The story so often retold.

The heavenly hosts song of great joy,
The night of the Savior’s birth,
Mary an’ Joseph’s Baby Boy,
Peace an’ goodwill to all the Earth.

His girls brought mem’rys of that night
Calm an’ quiet…so very serene,
He reveled in that joyous sight,
As he pictured that Holy Scene.

He sensed a great joy as he fed,
With the girls crowdin’ ‘round him,
He could hear that story his Dad read,
‘Bout the Savior’s birth in starlight dim.

He felt so blessed on that cold morn,
As he thanked God, on bended knee,
For His great love, Jesus was born!
Christmas on the Quarter Circle C.

© 2019,  Ol’ Jim Cathey
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

cowsjlk.jpg

Thanks to all who participated.

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SUBMISSIONS

•  Even if you have a poem or song pending, you are welcome to send one submission inspired by this painting.

•  Art Spur subjects are meant to inspire; we look for poems and songs inspired by the piece, not necessarily for a literal description of the image or its subject.

•  Do follow our regular guidelines for submissions.

•  When you email your submission to poems@cowboypoetry.com, please indicate in the subject line that it is an Art Spur submission.

Find some previous ART SPUR submissions here and here.

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jlk2019

Jo Lynne Kirkwood creates an impressive hand-crafted Christmas card each year, and this was her drawing for the cover of her 2017 card, accompanied by her poem, “Cattle at Christmas (or) Homage to Fake News.”

She has a fine book that collects her poetry, Old Houses, and recordings. Find more about her at cowboypoetry.com.

cowsjlk.jpg

Christmas at the BAR-D

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Welcome to the 20th annual Christmas at the BAR-D. We’ll be posting poems, classic, old, and new, during the season. Christmas Art Spur poems will be posted before Christmas.

Please consider pitching in to ensure BAR-D programs can go forward in 2020.

“Supporting the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry supports the entire community of cowboy/western artists. Before the holidays run up yer back, maul you around, and leave you wondering what happened, step up here and help out this tremendous resource if you can. You won’t regret it, and we can all thank each other! Please donate.”  Jerry Brooks 

Find a collection of Christmas poems, first started in 2000, here.

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2019 POSTS

Santa Shoer
Santa Must Be a Shoer,” by Andy Nelson

baxterwblue
Rudolph’s Night Off,” by Baxter Black

barkerfixed“A Cowboy’s Christmas Prayer,” by S. Omar Barker

timartspurThe Star and the Humble Cowboy,” by Dee Strickland Johnson (“Buckshot Dot”)

img523Wild Turkey Christmas,” by Jo Kirkwood

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Fox Waits in the Meadow,” by DW Groethe

Christmas Day…
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The Old-Time Christmas,” by Bruce Kiskaddon
Merry Christmas,” by Bruce Kiskaddon

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CLASSICS FROM THE COLLECTION

bustedcowboypic2018A Busted Cowboy’s Christmas,” by D.J. O’Malley

serenadereedyChristmas Serenade,” by J.W. Beeson

linecamp
Line-Camp Christmas,” by S. Omar Barker

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2019 SUBMITTED POEMS

“Santa on My Heels,” by Dan “Doc” Wilson
“No Regrets,” by Morgan Wilson
rdchristmas
“Christmas, 2019” by Robert Dennis
howrycow“The Christmas Cow,” by Ken Howry

 

 

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ART SPUR

“Cattle at Christmas (or) Homage to Fake News”
by Jo Lynne Kirkwood
“A True Country Christmas” by Michelle Turner
” A Christmas Memory” by Ol’ Jim Cathey

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The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Eight (2013) is a double CD compilation of vintage and contemporary recordings of some of the  best Christmas cowboy poetry.

In this eighth annual edition of The BAR-D Roundup, a diverse chorus of voices presents contemporary and classic Christmas works. Opening the collection is a beautiful rendition of the shaped-note “Christmas Waltz” by National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellow Buck Ramsey (1938-1998), accompanied by his sisters and brother. Great cowboy troubadour Don Edwards recites Badger Clark’s “The Christmas Trail”; top cowboy poet Waddie Mitchell offers his original “Good Gift”; Red Steagall, past Texas Poet Laureate and the state’s official cowboy poet delivers S. Omar Barker’s “Three Wise Men”; and the voice of Jimmy Dean (1928-2010) is heard in a vintage recording of S. Omar Barker’s “A Cowboy’s Christmas Prayer.”

Forty-three additional poets and reciters present a spirited range of poems, many of them from the CowboyPoetry.com archive of Christmas at the BAR-D, started in 2000. Some of the poems are from Christmas Art Spur projects at CowboyPoetry.com, where poets are invited to be inspired by art and photography.

Print

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Available for $25 postpaid in the US ($35 international)
Click above for credit card payments, or mail to CowboyPoetry.com,
PO Box 1107, Lexington, VA 24450

Every year’s CD includes a radio public service announcement about the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry. For this CD, it is delivered by ranch-raised rodeo broadcaster Totsie Slover.

The BAR-D Roundup cover images are usually vintage photos of poets or their forebears. This special Christmas collection veers slightly from that tradition with a photo of “Little Buddy” a steer from the Granley Ranch near Bainville, Montana (thanks to poet, picker, and ranch hand DW Groethe). Inside is a photograph of the annual live Nativity at Dick Noble and Jim and Tina Noble Nelson’s Flying U Ranch, in Cora, Wyoming.

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Find more at CowboyPoetry.com.

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Lost to us in 2019: Dennis Gaines, Cleve Rice, Tim Johnson, Leo Naumann, Diane Coggin Merrill, Mike Logan, Lucky Whipple, Rusty Feathers, Bruce Matley, Janice Mitich, Leon Rausch, Marion Manwill, Del Gustafson, and Carol Reffold.

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“Supporting the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry/CowboyPoetry.com supports the entire community of cowboy/western artists. Before the holidays run up yer back, maul you around, and leave you wondering what happened, step up here and help out this tremendous resource if you can. You won’t regret it, and we can all thank each other! Please donate.”  Jerry Brooks 

At CowboyPoetry.com (also known as the BAR-D) and the non-profit Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, our mission is to preserve, celebrate, and promote the arts and life of the real working West. Thanks to a great community of supporters, we have fulfilled that mission for twenty years. Right now your help is needed to continue the work of the BAR-D.

Now is a great time to renew your support or become a donor for the first time. Donations of any amount are valued. Donors at the $50 and higher level will receive the 2020 poster and CD.

You can donate here with a secure, on-line credit card payment.
You can also donate by mail: CowboyPoetry.com, PO Box 1107, Lexington, VA 24450. Find a printable form here.
The Center reaches out to rural communities each year during Cowboy Poetry Week, in its associated Rural Library program. Rural libraries across the West receive the year’s original Western art poster and an invitation for our annual CD for their collections. Poets and musicians bring their programs into libraries and other community centers during Cowboy Poetry Week. To keep those programs going–and all of the work of the Center including CowboyPoetry.com and our social media–we need your help.

Whether you are a renewing supporter (thank you) or a new supporter, your donation will make a crucial difference in the success our programs. Be a part of it all.There are gifts for you, too: U.S. donors of $50 also receive our annual CD and Western art poster. Read about all of the donor gifts here and find information for Canadian and international donors.

Thanks to all of our great sponsors and individual 209 donors to date. Find them all here.

If you have not supported the BAR-D recently, now is the time that your support will make the most critical difference. No amount is too small.

Generous donors make the Center’s work possible.
Through CowboyPoetry.com, our blogCowboy Poetry Week, the Rural Library Program, and social media (Facebook and Twitter), we reach many. All of this work is done on a small and careful budget. Your support is essential for it to continue. Find more here.

You can make a donation by check or money order, by mail (use the form here for mail to PO Box 1107, Lexington, VA 24450) or by a secure, on-line credit card payment through PayPal (a PayPal account is not required):

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CowboyPoetry.com is a project of The Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, a tax-exempt non-profit organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Service Act. The Center seeks grants and donations from individuals, corporate entities, foundations, and private sources.

Contributions to the Center are deductible for federal income tax purposes (except for the value of any CD received, $15).  As in all professional journalistic endeavors, no editorial preference is given to financial sponsors or supporters.

Join others in this community in supporting the BAR-D programs. Find the names of those generous current donors here.

SHOVELING ICE OUT OF THE TROUGH, Bruce Kiskaddon

cowsjlk“Cows,” © 2017, Jo Lynne Kirkwood; request permission for use

 

SHOVELING ICE OUT OF THE TROUGH
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

It’s frosty in the mornin’ when you wake up in the shack.
When you roll out of yore blankets, makes the chill go up yore back.
By the time you’ve got yore breakfast it is nice and warm inside,
But it’s time to git a goin’. You must saddle up and ride.

There is thick ice every mornin’ and you’ve got to chop it off.
Ice is all right in a highball, but it’s no good in a trough.
If the cattle don’t git water it soon begins to show,
They don’t keep in good condition jest a lickin’ up some snow.

I read once in a paper what some wise perfessors think.
They claim it’s only water that us humans ort to drink.
I’m jest speakin’ fer the cowboys, and I reckon as a class,
They’ll drink nothin’ else but water, when perfessors lives on grass.

The cows and calves look sorry, a walkin’ through the snow,
With their backs humped up an shivverin’ and bawlin’ sorter low.
A cowboy’s life’s a tough one but I reckon anyhow,
I’d sooner be a cowboy than I would to be a cow.

….by Bruce Kiskaddon from “Western Poems,” 1935

This drawing, titled “Cows,” by Utah teacher, poet, artist, and storyteller Jo Lynne Kirkwood is the 2019-2020 Winter/Christmas Art Spur, the 51st Art Spur subject from CowboyPoetry.com. In Art Spur, poets and songwriters are invited to let selections of  Western art inspire their poetry and songs.

Art Spur submissions may be Winter- or Christmas-themed. All Christmas poems (Art Spur or not) are welcome through Thursday, December 19, 2020. Winter-themed Art Spur poems are welcome through Tuesday, January 14, 2020. Find more here.

Jo Lynne Kirkwood creates an impressive hand-crafted Christmas card each year, and this was her drawing for the cover of her 2017 card, accompanied by her poem, “Cattle at Christmas (or) Homage to Fake News.”

She has a fine book that collects her poetry, “Old Houses,” and recordings. Find more about her at cowboypoetry.com.

South Dakota rancher, poet, and musician Robert Dennis recites “Shoveling Ice Out of the Trough” on this year’s triple CD from CowboyPoetry.com, MASTERS: VOLUME THREE, the poetry of Bruce Kiskaddon  (think Christmas giving!).

Much of what is known about Bruce Kiskaddon and his work comes from “Open Range,” Bill Siems’ monumental collection of Kiskaddon’s poetry. Find more in the Kiskaddon features at cowboypoetry.com.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this image with this post, but please request permission for other uses. The poem is in the public domain.)