EASY LIFE by Duane Nelson

duanenelson

EASY LIFE
by Duane Nelson

I’d like to cowboy for a livin’, but the pay just ain’t too good,
so I had to figure out another way.
Took a loan out from my banker, only mortgaged half my life,
house in town and all I’d saved, but that’s OK,

Cuz I leased myself some pasture, and bought a bunch of cows,
And I settled back to let myself get rich.
No more workin’ for the “other guy,” just handle my own stock.
I’ll tell ya, boys, I finally found my niche.

Three good bulls and sixty mamas, now that’s sixty calves a year,
Keep your heifers, sell the steers at market price.
Just slap yer brand onto ’em, let nature take its course,
Yeah it’s a gamble but it sure beats rollin’ dice.

Bought myself a one-ton, four wheel drive and dually too,
and a goose-neck trailer I can haul around.
Got a good old bay ranch gelding, a slick-fork saddle too,
And two “good” dogs I got down at the pound.

Now I’m set up for the “easy life,” just cowboy work to do,
and that’s more fun than work is what I say.
Just ride out in the sunshine, watch cows eat and poop and sleep,
And at shippin’ time I’ll gather in my pay.

But my fences started goin’ down; my horse was gettin’ tired,
from chasin’ cattle from the neighbor’s wheat.
So I bought myself some wire, four-point barbed and shiny new,
And somehow got it up all straight and neat.

‘Course that was kinda spendy, but I’d figured in the cost,
And I knew I’d still be rolling in the dough.
But I didn’t count on scours; my calves got awful sick,
and that was just the start of all my woes.

I had three cows abort their calves, pine needles were to blame,
and then there was a prolapse in the night.
I tell ya, that’s a struggle, in the ice and wind and rain,
But the old girl lived, I guess we got it right!

Then there’s hoof rot and pneumonia, then flies become a pain,
And of course you know there’s bloat and ringworm too.
And you gotta watch for black-leg, and there’s this thing called “wooden tongue”
They get that, they cannot eat, and they’re all through!

And have you tried to buy these vaccines? My gosh, they cost a lot.
You total them all up, it sure ain’t cheap.
And there’s minerals, and feeders, and boluses and grain…
Why the cost of gettin’ rich is getting steep!

When you’re calving all the neighbor’s dogs, and coyotes come to call,
And then there’s wolves, cuz liberals had their way.
And of course there’s all the cougars and now they’re talkin’ grizzly bears!
Hell, they’re big enough to eat a calf a day!

I had to baler wire my squeeze chute, so I could work my cows,
You know, ear tags, pour-ons, preg test, all that stuff.
My best bull broke his “tool box,” now Baloney is his name!
Got some money by the pound, but not enough.

When you take your calves to auction and they run ’em through the ring,
And they sell ’em at a dollar ten a pound;
But it cost you a buck-fifty to get ’em up to weight,
why as a business model that just isn’t sound!

So I sold off all my cattle and turned back my pasture lease,
And got myself a new job driving truck.
Sold my horse and trailer, that slick-fork saddle too.
Just wrote the whole thing off to rotten luck.

Of course, you know, there’s lots of time, when you’re behind the wheel,
To think up different ways of gettin’ rich.
And getting all that money, shouldn’t be so difficult;
All I gotta do is find that niche!

Hey, anybody want to go partners on some Thoroughbred race horses?

© Duane Nelson
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Oregon poet and cowboy Duane Nelson comments, “I wrote this poem for all those folks that think that just because beef is $5.00/lb. at the store, ranchers should have an easy time making money in the cattle business. And for all the people who think cowboys just ride out in nice weather in pretty country and look at a bunch of good lookin’ cows…”

You’ll find Duane at Western events including the Spirit of the West Cowboy Gathering February 15-17, 2019, in Ellensburg, Washington. He joins headliners Dave Stamey, Kristyn Harris, High Country Cowboys, Kathy Moss, Lynn Kopelke and and other featured performers Carter Junction, Panhandle Cowboys, Andy Bales, Paul Wilson, Rockin HW, Scott Glen Lambertsen, Lauralee Northcott, and Mark Seeley. Find more at ellensburgcowboygathering.com.

See more about Duane Nelson at CowboyPoetry.com.

Photo courtesy of Duane Nelson.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and photo with this post, but for other uses, request permission.)

THE GREATEST SPORT, by Georgie Sicking (1921-2016)

wildhorsesrphoto © Shirley Ross

THE GREATEST SPORT
by Georgie Sicking (1921-2016)

An old Nevada mustang,
As wild as she could be,
I’ll tell you all for sure,
She made a gambler out of me.

I forgot I was a mother,
I forgot I was a wife,
I bet it all in the hose I rode,
On him I bet my life.

The thrill of the chase with my roan,
Horse trying to give me a throw.
The smells of the rocks and the sagebrush,
The rattle of rocks as we go.

Blood running hot with excitement,
Mouth getting dry from the same,
In this world, ain’t nothin’ but the mustang,
Roan horse me and the game.

Mustang is getting winded
It slows down to a lope.
Roan horse is starting to weaken,
Mustang gets caught in a rope.

Roan horse’s sides are a heavin’,
And I am all out of breath.
Mustang faces rope a tremblin’,
It would have run to its death.

Sanity returns and I’m lookin’,
At the wild horse I just caught,
My prize of the chase,
Good looking or pretty it’s not.

A hammer head, crooked leg,
It’s awful short on the hip.
Little pig eyes, a scrawny U neck,
And it’s really long on the lip.

No, she sure ain’t worth much,
For sure she ain’t no pearl.
But she took me away from a humdrum life,
Right to the edge of the world.

Now mustanging is a fever like,
Alchohol, gamblin’ and such.
I guess it don’t really matter if what you catch,
Ain’t worth all that much.

This was before the laws passed,
That feed the city people’s dreams.
I was lucky to enjoy the greatest sport,
Of cowboys and of kings.

© Georgie Sicking, used with permission

Much-loved cowboy and Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame inductee Georgie Sicking, who died in 2016 at age 95, continues to inspire poets and cowboys. She has said that this poem is the result of her many mustanging experiences, experiences that “take you to the edge of the world.”

She tells about her first time in her book, Just More Thinking, when her husband, Frank, worked for the Green Cattle Company, which “…branded the O RO. They really had good horses, and rules were that those horses were not to be run after mustangs. Frank and I sighted a bunch of mustangs one day. I was riding a big brown O RO gelding. I told Frank that I bet old Ranger could give me a throw at one of those wild ones. He said that no way could Ranger carry my weight and run as fast as a wild horse, so to prove my point, I roped the mustang, which got away with my rope. I wanted that kept quiet as I didn’t want Frank to lose his job because of my breaking the rules. Roscoe Latham was the boss at the time. Frank and I went to the ranch one day, and Roscoe looked at me and said, ‘Young lady, I want to see you in my office,’ and I got scared! I walked in, he was sitting behind a desk, frowning. He said, ‘I have heard that you roped a mustang,’and I said, ‘yes.’ He said, ‘I also heard that you lost your rope,’ and I said, ‘yes.’

“He reached down under his desk and handed me a new rope, saying, ‘Now don’t lose this one.’ He still let me ride O RO horses.”

When WWII began and cowboys were hard to find, Georgie was hired on at the O RO, the only woman who ever drew pay at the Arizona ranch.

Georgie often mustanged with her friend Leonard Stephens, and the outstanding documentary about her, Ridin’ & Rhymin’  includes scenes of them recounting their experiences. She writes in Just More Thinking, that a ranch where they worked, “…was overrun and grazed off by wild horses. Sometimes the check from the main office would be slow…and [we] would rope enough horses for a truckload, and he would haul them to Fallon or Fernley to sell them. Then we would buy groceries.”

Georgie preferred to be called a “cowboy,” not “cowgirl.” She is quoted in Tough by Nature, Some people had the idea that all you had to do to be a cowgirl was put on a pretty dress and a pair of boots and a big hat and get a faraway look in your eyes…and you’re a cowgirl. They’ve been kind of hard to educate.”

Of Ridin’ & Rhymin’” the award-winning documentary about Georgie Sicking by Greg Snider and Dawn Smallman of Far Away Films (www.farawayfilm.com), Hal Cannon, retired Founding Director of the Western Folklife Center, comments, “Georgie Sicking is why ‘to cowboy’ is best used as a verb to explain a work, a life, and a big open land. This film captures her level gazed life in such a powerful way that it defines the American West.” A DVD is available at http://farawayfilm.com/rr.html.

Find some of her poetry and more about Georgie Sicking at CowboyPoetry.com.

This photograph, by Shirley Ross, was taken on the Virginia Range near Fernley, Nevada. Shirley Ross, who lives in Chico, California, is a native of Honey Lake Valley in Lassen County. She comments, “Even though I have lived in Chico for a number of years, I always return to the high desert to photograph any wildlife I come across, revisit ranches I lived on growing up, and to visit life-long friends and even some new ones.” She has many impressive photos of wild horses birds of prey, and more.

Thanks to Cindy Stout Quigley of CMQ Photography for introducing us to Shirley Ross.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and photo with this post, but for other uses, please request permission.)

THE RAIN by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

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© Tim Cox,  “Racing Sundown”

 

THE RAIN
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

It ain’t so very pleasant when the rain is pourin’ down,
And a hoss cain’t even hurry on the wet and muddy ground,
For the rain has done and got you lots of miles from anywhere,
So it ain’t no use to hurry fer it wouldn’t git you there.

So you jest hump up and take it as you ride across the flat,
While your clothes is wet and soakin’ and the rain runs off your hat.
You git cold acrost the shoulders and your back is gittin’ wet.
And there’s quite a bit of moisture in the saddle where you set.

And it sorter sets you thinkin’ of the folks that live in town.
They go indoors when it’s rainin’, all they do it set around.
But the man that punches cattle doesn’t get a break like that.
There ain’t no roof on a saddle; he lives onderneath his hat.

When a cowboy hits bad weather he shore makes some solemn vows
That he’s through a poundin’ leather and he’s through a punchin’ cows.
Yes, he does a heap of growlin’ but it doesn’t mean a lot
Fer a rain don’t hurt him any and it’s mighty soon forgot.

And it eases up his feelin’s fer to make a little talk,
But he knows it’s good fer paster and it’s mighty good for stock.
And, to tell the truth, it’s funny WHY a waddy talks like that
When it makes the bosses money and it keeps his hosses fat.

So he ort to stop and figger he is there to earn his pay,
And there ain’t no job a goin’ that is pleasant every way.
But he knows without no tellin’ if a job was only fun
Folks would pay to git to do it, ‘stead of pay to git it done.

…Bruce Kiskaddon, 1936

In his introduction to Kiskaddon’s 1924 book, “Rhymes of the Ranges,” Frank King wrote, “Bruce Kiskaddon is a real old time cowboy, having started his cattle ranch experience in the Picket Wire district of southern Colorado as a kid cowhand and rough string rider and later on northern Arizona ranges, especially as a writer for the late Tap Duncan, famous as a Texas and Arizona cattleman, and one time the largest cattle holder in Mojave County, Arizona, where Bruce rode for years, after which he took a turn as a rider on big cattle stations in Australia. All this experience is reflected in his western poems, because he has had actual experience in the themes he puts into verse, He had no college professor teach him anything. He is a natural born poet and his poems show he knows his business. The best cowhand poems I have ever read. His books should be
in every home and library where western poetry is enjoyed.”

Much of what is known about Kiskaddon and his work comes from “Open Range,” Bill Siems’ monumental collection of Kiskaddon’s poetry. Bill Siems also collected Bruce Kiskaddon’s short stories in a book called “Shorty’s Yarns.” Find more in the Kiskaddon features at CowboyPoetry.com.

This great painting by Tim Cox, “Racing Sundown,” is a fun contrast to this poem. It’s available in a number of formats here.

One of today’s most visible and most popular Western artists who has earned countless awards, his bio tells that, “Tim is a fourth generation Arizonan born in 1957 and raised in the farming and ranching community of Duncan, Arizona near the New Mexico state line.” Find more at timcox.com and also at the Cowboy Artists of America site.

Thanks to Suzie Cox and Tim Cox for their permissions.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this image with this post, but for any other use, please request permission. The poem is in the public domain.)

WAITIN’ FOR SOME RAIN by Chris Isaacs

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WAITIN’ FOR SOME RAIN
by Chris Isaacs

The coolness of the morning air hides well the bitter fact
That temperature means little when the ground is dry and cracked.
Aspen leaves on Escudilla show their green against the sky,
But its only natures apparition ’cause the stock tanks are all dry.

The older cows they know its time to move to summer range;
To green grass and easy livin’, they don’t understand the change
That Mother Natures dealt to us these past six or seven years,
So we push them back to winter ground and try to stifle fears.

Here it is the first of June and we’re still out here feedin’ hay
And hopin’ for a red sky every morning as we start another day.
Saw cattle trucks pull into the Nine Cross, our nearest neighbors place.
Guess they had all that they could take of this droughts dry embrace.

The radio said there’s a chance for rain in another week or two.
Guess we’ll say a prayer, cross our fingers and hope that that is true.
We’ll bear down a little harder, do the work and bear the pain,
Watch for clouds and haul more water while we’re waitin’ for some rain.

© 2018, Chris Isaacs, used with permission

Cowboy, packer, and popular poet and humorist Chris Isaacs comments, “The drought in the Southwest part of the US is serious folks and Arizona is being hit especially hard. We live about 10 miles from the head waters of the Little Colorado River and it has quit running for only the second time in the last 100 years. It is a serious situation friends and we are praying hard for some rain!”

Chris shared this photo, which was taken earlier this year.

You’ll find Chris next at the Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering. This year’s event is its 31st anniversary, August 9-11, 2018, in Prescott. Performers include Gary Allegretto, Sally Bates, Floyd Beard, Valerie Beard, Broken Chair Band, Dale Burson, Marleen Bussma, Don Cadden, Dean Cook, Doris Daley, Kevin Davis, Sam DeLeeuw, Mike Dunn, Thatch Elmer, Don Fernwalt, Linda Lee Filener, Pipp Gillette, Amy Hale Auker, Randy Huston, Chris Isaacs, Gary Kirkman, Suzi Killman, Steve Lindsey, Mary Matli, Dave McCall, Deanna Dickinson McCall, Al “Doc” Mehl, Mike Moutoux, Mark Munzert, Old Time Fiddlers, Jay Parson, Jean Prescott & Gary Prescott, Dennis Russell, Rusty Pistols Reloaded, Buck Ryberg, Jim & Nancy Sober, Jay Snider, Gail Steiger, and Barry Ward. Find more at azcowboypoets.org.

Chris Isaacs collects stories in his recent book, An Element of Truth. Red Steagall​ writes, ” …Chris Isaacs is a master storyteller and poet. He will take you on some incredible journeys….” If you follow Chris on Facebook, you’ll see he’s been in a storytelling mode. Find more about Chris Isaacs in a feature at CowboyPoetry.com and at his site, chrisisaacs.com.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and photo with this post, but it must be licensed for any other use. The poem is in the public domain.)

 

News Bits and Links

readingnews“Reading the News,” by Erwin E. Smith, c. 1908 from The Library of Congress

We receive and come across all sorts of interesting information from a wide range of sources. Below, we gather some quick links to news stories, web features, and other items of interest gathered from the web, social media, and from you, the most recent posted first.

Your suggestions for consideration of inclusion are welcome (as well as your comments). Email us.

CP_Smith_Poster_15X20_R3
Cowboy Poetry Week
Eighteenth annual: April 21-27, 2019

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Inside the Story: 14-year-old cowboy poet bringing back the Old West,” by Dan
Rascon, kutv.com, July 11, 2018

Kelly Inducted into Utah Cowboy Hall of Fame,” wasatchwave.com, July 11, 2018

A Flagship’s Proposed Slogan — ‘The World Needs More Cowboys’ — Draws Fire Out
West,” by Claire Hansen, The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 10, 2018

Wanted: The Perfect Horse,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, July 6, 2018

2018 Western Horseman Youth Art Contest Winners,” by Katie Frank, Western
Horseman, July 6, 2018

Taking Note: Poetry Reading Is Up—Federal Survey Results,” by Sunil Iyengar,
NEA, June 7, 2018

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A Close Call,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  July 9, 2018

The Jackie Robinson of Rodeo,” by Christian Wallace, Texas Monthly, July, 2018

A Hidden History of Black Cowboys, As Told By Dom Flemons…,” by Craig Havighurst, wmot.org, July 6, 2018

Fiddling, harmonizing Quebe Sisters at Strand,” Village Soup, July 6, 2018

Horses Had Dentists 3,000 Years Ago,” by Megan Gannon, National Geographic, July 2, 2018

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The Last Cowboys: A Cattle-Ranching Family Fights to Survive,”  by Simon Worrall, National Geographic, June 29, 2018

Tornado damages ranches in Harding County, South Dakota,” tsln.com, June 29, 2018

Cowboy Poetry is alive and kicking,” Flint Hills Media Project,  June 2018

Picture This!,” Elko Daily Free Press, June 29, 2018

Poetry in (rodeo) motion,” Rodeo News, June, 2018

31st Annual Gathering of Cowboy Poets Set for mid-August,” signalsaz.com, June 28, 2018

Cowboy poetry at Westgate library,” by Brian Roche, wtvy.com, June 28, 2018

Where’s the beef? Texas man accused of being all hat, no cattle,” by Patrick Johnston, Wichita Falls Times Record News, June 28, 2018

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Value on tradition,” by Hunter Marrow,  Hunter Marrow, The Argus Observer, June 22, 2018

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Michael Martin Murphey, Cowboy Crossroads, June 19, 2018

Saddle up! The Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive rides into town…,” DailyMail.com, June 17, 2018

Manhattanites keep Cowboy Poetry alive,” by Ann Olamiju, wibw.com, June 15, 2018

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Cattle Couplets and Equine Quatrains,” by Rod Miller, Saddlebag Dispatches, Summer 2018.

Bar D Chuckwagon celebrates 50th summer season,” by Katie Chicklinski-Cahill, Durango Herald, June 21, 2018

Singing cowboy Ron Ball still wears the white hat,” by Claire Woodcock, Trail-Gazette, June 21, 2018

Riverbend Live Just Over Two Weeks Away,” by Kyle Bailey, KQEN, June 21, 2018

Stavely hosts 18th annual Willow Creek Cowboy Gathering,” by Ian Gustafson, nantonnews.com,  June 20, 2018

2018 Legends and Legacies draws full crowd,”  by Roger Cline, Big Spring Herald, June 20, 2018

A Day to Remember,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  June 19, 2018

Dryden performs original cowboy poetry at Arizona Heritage Center,” eacourier.com, June 19, 2018

Working Ranch Cowboys Association: For the Greater Good,” by Savanna Simmons, tsln.com, June 18, 2018

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Lies They Tell Writers, Part 44: Editors Love Enthusiasm.,” by Rod Miller (blog), June 18, 2018

How ranchers in the West survive on their winnings from rodeo riding,” by Carson
Vaughan, Washington Post, June 15, 2018

In Yellowstone, Heavy Lies the Stetson (on Kevin Costner’s Head),” by Carson
Vaughan, In These Times, June 14, 2018

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The Role Of The Rodeo In A Changing West,” 1a.org, June 14, 2018

Cowboying Up,” Durango Telegraph, June 14, 2018

Cowboy Poetry [is] Earlier this year,” by Michael Acosta, Lake County Examiner, June 13, 2018

Festival celebrates arts, culture,” Independent Enterprise, June 13, 2018

Big Book of Buzzwords,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  June 12, 2018

Louis L’Amour’s Legacy,” by Jesse Hughey, Cowboys & Indians, June 7, 2018

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It isn’t always money that makes us rich,” by Jessie Veeder, Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch (blog), June 11, 2018

You Can’t Stop This Two-legged Ranch Dog From Working the Herd,” by Sara Brown, Drovers, June 7, 2018

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Rick Huff’s Best of the West Reviews, Summer 2018

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Saddling up for Kansas Cowboy Poetry Contest,” WIBW, June 8, 2018

Chopper Cowboys,” by Katie Frank and Jennifer Denison, Western Horseman, June 7,
2018

End of May is payday for cattle ranchers,” by Gilroy Dispatch, June 6, 2018

On D-Day anniversary, Nampa ceremony honors those ‘too young to shave,’KTVB,
June 6, 2018

Horsemen gather in Barriere from all over B.C. to enjoy Rendezvous 2018,” by Jill Hayward, Barriere Star Journal, June 5, 2018

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Rim Country’s hidden gem – Dee Strickland Johnson, AKA ‘Buckshot Dot‘,” by Robin D. Bowen, Payson Roundup, June 5, 2018

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Flynt and Frank,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  June 4, 2018

Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering video

Gardening season means secret manure stashes, friendly father-daughter rivalry,” by Jessie Veeder, Inforum, June 3, 2018

Witness Footage of Cows Flying Through a Wyoming Tornado,” rock97online.com, May 29, 2018

‘The Last Cowboys’ Review: Giving Good Rein,” by Andrew Graybill, Wall Street Journal,
May 25, 2018

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Museum curator on archiving Will James’ art and writing: His ‘work should not be forgotten’,” by Anna Paige, Billings Gazette, June 1, 2018

A Cowboy’s Crown,” by Katie Frank, Western Horseman, June 1, 2018 (from a 2016 article)

Wylee Mitchell: Poetry in motion at rodeos,” by Anthony Mori, Elko Daily Free Press, May 31, 2018

Medora, ND and Mt. Rushmore,” by Vic Anderson, eptrail.com, May 31, 2018

Nevada authorities ask for help after 200+ cows missing,” Ag Daily,  May 21, 2018

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Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Wallace McRae, Cowboy Crossroads, May 30, 2018

Feedlot Cowboy,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  May 30, 2018

The Top 10 hay-making challenges,” by Mark Parker, farmtalknewspaper.com, May 30, 2018

Rare quadruplet calves born on central Minnesota farm,”  by Robin Huebner, agweek.com, May 30, 2018

Rancher Explores Cowboy Culture In Kazakhstan,” by Jerome McDonnell, wbez.org,
May 8, 2018

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2018 National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo and Chisholm Trail Western Music Show August 2-4, 2018, Abilene, Kansas

Coyotes Conquered North America. Now They’re Heading South,” by JoAnna Klein, New York Times, May 24, 2018

Tending the fields like a pioneer…,” by Murray Crawford, reddeeradvocate.com, May 23, 2018

“Open Air Art Day in New Raymer June 2,” South Platte Sentinel, May 22, 2018

A tradition: Dakota Cowboy Poetry Gathering,” thedickinsonpress.com, May 21, 2018

Marion C. Manwill 1930-2018,” heraldextra.com, May 20, 2018

Coffee table book displays artists’ renderings of horses,”  by Glenn Dromgoole, theeagle.com, May 20, 2018

‘Black Cowboys’ and ‘The Best Country Blues You’ve Never Heard’ Chart New Trails
through Old-Time Music,” by Mark Reynolds, popmatters.com, May 18, 2018

Riverbend Live Announces 2018 Season,” by Kyle Bailey, kqennewsradio.com,  May 17, 2018

Town: National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo” (video with Geff Dawson),  eaglecomtv.net, May 14, 2018

Celebrating the Colt,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, May 10, 2018

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Livestock auction finds community helping youths,” Calaveras Enterprise, May 6, 2018

Higher Education,” by Rod Miller, blog, May 5, 2018

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Iconic Cap-K Ranch still going strong after 131 years as cattle operation,” by Scott Condon, Aspen Times, May 6, 2018

Celebrate western heritage and the Air Force this week in Abilene,” by Nathaniel Ellsworth, Abilene Reporter-News, May 6, 2018

Mom Leads Sons to Cattle Farming,” by Linda Williams, Lancaster Farming, May 4, 2018

Exploring the impacts of a world without food animals,” farmanddairy.com, May 4, 2018

Calving conundrums,” by Peggy Sanders, The Fence Post, May 4, 2018

How the West was one at Abilene’s Western Heritage Classic,” by Greg Jaklewicz, Abilene Reporter-News, May 3, 2018

Black Cowboys Are Real,” by Rory Doyle, Bitter Southerner, May 1, 2018

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Never felt more like singing the blues: Gibson guitar firm files for bankruptcy,” by Edward Helmore, The Guardian, May 1, 2018

25th Anniversary Cowboy Festival Gala” (video), sctv.com, May 1, 2018

Our Amazing Grasslands~Schell Ranch” (video), USDA NRCS South Dakota,
April 30, 2018

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Classified Ads (Interpreted),” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  April 30, 2018

Mesquite Days returns to bring festivities to the Virgin Valley,” by Terell Wilkins, The Spectrum, April 30, 2018

Stagecoach 2018: The 10 things we’ll remember about the festival,” by Vanessa Franko and Kelli Skye Fadroski,  The Press-Enterprise,  April 30, 2018

Oklahoma wildfire causes significant cattle fatalities,” by Ashley Williams, globalmeatnews.com, April 28, 2018

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Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with John Erickson of “Hank the Cowdog” (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, April 26, 2018

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My Baby, The Bull” By Darrell Arnold, Western Horseman, as written in December 1985, posted April 27, 2018

Eight members of rodeo’s first family will compete in Clovis. A new book tells their story,” by Marek Warszawski, Fresno Bee, April 26, 2018

Montana Playwrights Network Writer’s Challenge,” Helena Independent Record, April 25, 2018

Western writers’ cookbook brings Old West and contemporary, home-style cooking together,” by Kristen Inbody, Great Falls Tribune, April 24, 2018

Cowboy poet visits Whitecourt,” by Taryn Brandell, Whitecourt Star, April 23, 2018

‘Black Cowboys’ Sheds Light On Overlooked Music Of African-Americans Who Went
West,” by Eric Westervelt, Here and Now, April 23, 2018

Whitewood students learn about local Cowboy Poet,” (video) KEVN, April 18, 2018

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Calving season and small triumphs,” by Jessie Veeder, Meanwhile, Back at the
Ranch (blog), April 23, 2018

Stars Share Spotlight as Cowboy Festival Turns 25,” scvnews.com, April 22, 2018

“‘The Rider,’ starring a real rodeo horseman, is a breath of fresh prairie air for westerns,” by Ann Hornaday, Washington Post, April 18, 2018

Suspect charged, arrested in million dollar cattle embezzlement case,” High Plains / Midwest Ag Journal, April 16, 2018

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Just 14-years-old, this cowboy poet holds his own on the national stage,” by JaNae Francis, Standard-Examiner, April 21, 2018

Winter Blues,” by Frank Gleeson (poem), Williams Lake Tribune, April 20, 2018

A sign of the future in Morris: Cows + solar panels + fast electric car charger,” by Elizabeth Dunbar, mprnews.org,  April 20, 2018

A Cowboy’s Artist,” (on Bill Owen),  Western Horseman, archived article posted April 20, 2018

Flashback: Will Rogers’ Short Maguey,” by Dick Spencer III, Western Horseman, as written in April 1975, posted April 20, 2018

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The Dude Wrangler,” by Dave Stamey, Facebook, April 19, 2018

Dom Flemons Is Rewriting the American Songbook,” by Sriram Gopal, Washington City Paper, April 19, 2018

Western Folklife Center presents Texas songster Andy Hedges,” Elko Daily Free Press, April 18, 2018

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Ashley: Cowboy poet with Hill Country roots,” by Lindy Segall, Fredericksburg Standard, April 18, 2018

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Q&A: Dom Flemons” (with video), by Kristin Brown, Cowboys & Indians, April 16, 2018

For Nebraska cowboy poet R.P. Smith, the spirit of the West lives on in rhyme,” by Blake Ursch, Omaha World-Herald, April 16, 2018

I Was Only Trying to Help,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  April 16, 2018

“Lies They Tell Writers, Part 44: Anyone can learn to write,” by Rod Miller, blog, April 16, 2018

Al Jackson, a living legend,” by Cynthia Delaney, Elko Daily Free Press, April 14, 2018

Bovines online: Farmers are using AI to help monitor cows,” by Ryan Nakashima, Yahoo! News, April 13, 2018

__________

Dom Flemons,” (audio) by Ann Powers, World Cafe, April 12, 2018

A Devastating Fall Couldn’t Keep This Rodeo ‘Rider’ Off Wild Horses,” by Terry
Gross, Fresh Air, April 10, 2018

The New Head Catch,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  April 10, 2018

__________

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Jerry Brooks (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, April 10, 2018

Husband-and-Wife Work Crew,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, April 9, 2018

The Last Cowboys  (forthcoming book)

The Ranch at the End of the West,” by Mike Coppock, Cowboys & Indians, March 27,
2018

__________

Neighbor Kelly,” by Jessie Veeder, Meanwhile…Back at the Ranch (blog), April 9,
2018

Cowboy poet masters skill of storytelling,” by Ryan Soderlin, KMTV, April 9, 2018

Quiet Pride” (about Shawn Cameron), by Jennifer Denison, Western Horseman, undated

A Nevada Legacy,” (video) by John Wright, J.M. Capriola, undated

__________

Western Folklife Center seeks Programs Manager April 6, 2018

Alaskan cowboys bring local beef to the table,” by Jennifer Tarnacki, Homer News, April 5, 2018

Remembering the Queen of Cowboy Poetry,” by Chynna Lockett, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, April 5, 2018

Drovers of the Chisholm Trail,” (video), Western Horseman, April 5, 2018

A Love Story,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  April 4, 2018

__________

April Events at the Dayton Library,” Waitsburg Times, April 5, 2018

Poetry reading at Kingman library,” by Vanessa Espinoza, Daily Miner, April
5, 2018

Cowboy poet releases new album,” by Tammy Rollie, Western Wheel, April 4, 2018

On New Album, D.C. Musician Dom Flemons Shares the Lesser-Known History of
African American Cowboys,” by Stephanie Williams, dcmusicdownload.com, April 4,
2018

Genoa celebrates Western Heritage April 27-29,” Record-Courier, April 3, 2018

Herd of wild horses blocks Arizona road,” by Ben Hooper, upi.com, April 3, 2018

__________

Hail and Farewell: Elizabeth Ebert, ‘Grand Dame of Cowboy Poetry,’ 1925-2018,”
by Simon Reichley, Melville House, April 4, 2018

The Days When Cattle Were King and Barns Were Round,” by Jessica Hedges,
Branded in Ink, April 3, 2018

For Cowboy Poets, One Topic is Taboo,” by Carson Vaughan, In These Times,
April 3, 2018

Misty Morning Gathers,” Ross Hecox, Western Horseman, April 3, 2018

GPS finds home on the range,” by Tyler Harris, Nebraska Farmer, March 29, 2018

__________

Elizabeth Ebert, ‘Grand Dame of Cowboy Poetry,’ Dies at 93,” by Carson Vaughan, New York Times, April 1, 2018

William S. Hart Park 2018 Events, ” by Johnathan Sanchez, The Signal, March 31, 2018

Dude ranches of the Wild West,” by Jim Winnerman, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 31, 2018

For the Compton Cowboys, Horseback Riding Is a Legacy, and Protection,” by  Walter
Thompson-Hernández, New York Times, March 31, 2018

In the Battle for the American West, the Cowboys Are Losing,” by Jim Carlton, Wall Street Journal, March 30, 2018

6 artists added to the official Kansas Touring Roster,”  The Emporia Gazette, March 30, 2018

Glen Hollenbeck: Still riding for the G2 brand,” by Hannah Johlman, Tri-State Livestock News, March 29, 2018

Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival Celebrating Our Western Past,” The Magazine of Santa Clarita, March 29, 2018

__________

Smooth to the Chute,” by Ross Hecox, Western Horseman, March 28, 2018

“A Celebration Among the Saguaros,” by Rod Miller, blog, March 28, 2018

Cowboy Poetry Named Advocate of the Arts 2018,” Wasatch Wave, March 28, 2018

Ranchers Get More Grazing Flexibility With New Program,” by Amanda Peacher, Wyoming Public Media, March 27, 2018

__________

 

To live in these moments,” by Jessie Veeder, Back at the Ranch blog, March
26, 2018

Flashback: An Old Ranch Custom,” by Luis B. Ortega, written February 1951,
Western Horseman, March 25, 2018

…National Cowboy Museum showcases rarely seen oddities and outliers with
exhibit ‘Unlocking the Vault’,” by Brandy McDonnell, NewsOK, March 25, 2018

_________

2018 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering photos by Jessica Lifland, posted March
22, 2018

“My Favorite Book, Part 13,” by Rod Miller, blog, March 22, 2018

The Top 10 indications spring is officially here,” by Mark Parker, FarmTalk,
March 20, 2018

Experience Old Florida Folk Fest at Summer Crush Gary Roberts,” TCPalm, March
19, 2018

Ranch Life: Dirty Boots and Hands,” by Wyatt Bechtel, drovers.com, March 17, 2018

Western Oklahoma drought intensifying,” by Derrell S. Peel, Progressive Cattleman, March 14, 2018

Writers present scholarship,” Payson Roundup, March 16, 2018

__________

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Riders in the Sky (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, March 20, 2018

A Pox on this Column,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  March 20, 2018

Top Two Houston Steers Sell for $776,000; Reserve Sets World Record,” by Greg Henderson, agweb.com, March 19, 2018

Paul Zarzyski.com and “Butte”

Academy of Western Artists’ awards  March 18, 2018

Kansas Cowboy Poetry Contest

Ranching on the Rocks,” Western Horseman (from 2012), March 19, 2018

__________

Gads, gut hooks, and grapplin’ irons,” by Rod Miller, blog, March 13, 2018

The Top 10 items you probably won’t find in town folks’ homes,” by Mark Parker, Farm Talk, March 13, 2018

Lorraine,” by Baxter Black (a poem in the latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  March 12, 2018

A Time To Stay, A Time To Go” (video), by Baxter Black, drovers.com, March 12, 2018

The Tragedy of Cattle Kate,” by Eliza McGraw, Smithsonian, March 12, 2018

Spirit of the West Radio with Hugh McLennan

Western Writers of America, Spur Award winners and finalists

Crews continue work to contain wildfires that have burned more than 1.4
million acres across four states,” by Josh Wallace, newsok.com,  March 10, 2017

__________

Western Writers of America Announces 2018 Spur Award Winnersprnewswire, March 9, 2018

Elko, Nevada, Cowboy Poetry Festival brings out the best in all of us,” by Nadine Bailey, redding.com, March 9, 2018

Cowboy Festival returning to the River City,” by Sean Brady, kamloopsthisweek.com,  March 8, 2018 0

The Faces of the 34th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering,  Western Foklife Center

__________

Cowculations,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, March 7, 2018

__________

Moapa Valley Days Events Planned For This Weekend,” by Maggie McMurray, Moapa Valley Progress, March 7, 2018

Jekyll & Hide Cattle Company,” by Baxter Black (a poem in the latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  March 6, 2018

The Top 10 farm and ranch rarities,” by Mark Parker, FarmTalknewspaper.com,
March 6, 2018

A year later, ranchers are healing after Kansas’ largest wildfire,” by Amy Bickel, hpj.com, March 5, 2018

__________

Cowboys sold out the show,” by Teri Nehrenz, Mesquite Local News, March 2,
2018

As Washington state looks for cleaner power, a Montana coal town faces an
uncertain future,” by Hal Bernton, Seattle Times, March 1, 2018

Cowboy Poetry Festival a hit with families,” by David Nystrom, Prescott Valley
Tribune, February 28, 2018

Eureka County 4-H Youth Share Journey Through Cowboy Poetry,” by Joelle Mackay, Eureka Sentinel, February 28, 2018|

__________

Fractious Freight,” by Ross Hecox, Western Horseman, February 28, 2018

Advice Column,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  February 27, 2018

Wisdom from Down Under,” by Rod Miller (blog), February 26, 2018

__________

EquiFest draws thousands of horse lovers to Kansas Expocentre,” by By Katie Moore, cjonline.com, February 25, 2018

Ancient DNA rules out archeologists’ best bet for horse domestication,” by Cathleen O’Grady, arstechnica, February 25, 2018

Watch what you pray for,” by Yvonne Hollenbeck, Tri-State Livestock News,
February 23, 2018

_________

Glendale Folk and Heritage Festival,” The Glendale Star, February 22, 2018

Pitching a wearable to make cattle farming more sustainable…,” by Jonathan Shiever, Yahoo! Finance, February 22, 2018

Elko Basques teach us a lesson,” by Monika Madinabeitia, Elko Daily, February 22, 2018

__________

Land lover,” by Josie Glassberg, Reno News, February 22, 2018

Tunes on the Trail,” by Gene Fowler, TexasCoopPower.com, March 2018

__________

Heifer’s Hood Ornament,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  February 20, 2018

Rifters return to Society Hall,” Alamosa News, February 20, 2018

Humor, Western zeal part of Spirit of the West,” by Daisy Perez, citizentribune.com, February 19, 2018

At 21, FisherPoets comes of age,” Daily Astorian, February 19, 2018

Teddy Roosevelt’s Saddle,” by Dick Spencer III, written January 1958, Western Horseman, February, 2018

Lies They Tell Writers, Part 43: Read Aloud What You’ve Written,” by Rod Miller
(blog), February 17, 2018

How a coalition of caretakers is keeping Wyoming’s ghost towns alive,” by Elise Schmelzer and Christine Peterson, Star-Tribune, February 17, 2018

BC Cowboy Heritage Society Newsletter February, 2018

Everyone seemed to have enjoyed it,” by Brendan Kyle, 100milefreepress.net, February 16, 2018

What Do Gender Relations Look Like in Rural America?,” by Kyle Young, thisisreno.com, February 16, 2018

__________

Quick Q and A with Dom Flemons,” by Kathy Sands-Boehmer, Everything Sundry (blog), February 15, 2018

Cowboy spirit to come alive in Ellensburg this weekend,” by Daisy Perez, Daily Record, February 15, 2018

Western Fest,” Tacoma Weekly, February 15, 2018

__________

Save American Poetry, Read a Cowboy,” by Max Ufberg, Pacific Standard, February 14, 2018

Dom Flemons announces a double release,” by Pamm Tucker, Bluegrasstoday.com, February 14, 2018

Enjoy an evening of cowboy poetry, music,” pvtrib.com, February 14, 2018

__________

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Andy Wilkinson (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, February 13, 2018

The Mountain,” by Baxter Black (a poem in the latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  February 13, 2018

__________

Gathering Hangover- Cochise Cowboy Poetry Gathering 2018,” by Jessica Hedges, Branded in Ink (blog), February 7, 2018

Kentrollins.com,  blog, recipies, and more

__________


Guy William Logsdon
, tulsaworld.com, February 8, 2018

Cowboy Poetry with Pickles,” by Rod Miller, blog, February 8, 2018

Pig Tales,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  February 6, 2018

Woody Guthrie Expert, Educator Guy Logsdon Dies,” newson6.com, February 6, 2018

One More Time,” by TJ Casey & Jim Reader;  in honor of late Bill Stearns, Wyoming cowboy and Senior World Champion Bronc Rider, YouTube, February 4, 2018

National Cowboy Poetry Gathering YouTube channel.

_____________________________

Trail gone cold: Dusty Richards, Rod Miller (blog),  January 23, 2018

__________

Cowby Arts and Gear Museum

Moving the Remuda,” by Ross Hecox (photo blog), Western Horseman, January 22, 2018

Country Artist and Cowboy Poet Receives National Golden Spur Award,” by Mary Beth Holm, Daily Toreador, January 22, 2018

New brochure will highlight Elko art,” by Adella Harding, Elko Daily, January 22, 2018

Time machine: Cowboy Arts and Gear Museum restores G.S. Garcia’s shop,” by Toni R. Milano, Elko Daily,  January 20, 2018

Cowboy poetry set to come to Payson with symposium, program,” by Shelby Slade, Daily Herald, January 19, 2018

34th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering,” by Dennis Cassinelli, Mesquite Local News,

Quirky places to eat on your next trip…,” by Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Time, January 19, 2018

__________

Writing in My Sleep,”  by Rod Miller, blog,  January 17, 2018

Braymer Bait,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  January 16, 2018

Corb Lund and Ian Tyson: The Last cowboys,” by Mike Ross, gigcity.ca, January 14, 2018

Red Steagall chosen for National Golden Spur Award,” by Ray Westbroom, lubbockonline.com, January 13, 2018

Small Towns, Cowboy Charm,” Western Horseman, undated

Trailing Cattle in the Snow,” Western Horseman, January 2018

__________

Ranching by the signs,” by Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns, tsln.com, January 11, 2018

Women Writing About the Wild: 25 Essential Authors,” Kathryn Aalto, outsideonline.com, January 9, 2018

__________

Singer Ian Tyson on his early folk days and being inspired by Bob Dylan,” by Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail, January 8, 2018

__________

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Gary McMahan (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, January 9, 2018

Things You Can Count On,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  January 8, 2018

The Birth of the American Cowboy,” Christopher Knowlton excerpt, Delanceyplace.com,
January 8, 2018

My Favorite Book, Part 12,” by Rod Miller, blog,  January 8, 2018

Cowboy Poets Ramble Back To Golden,” by Jean Lotus, patch.com, January 8, 2018

Man arrested after allegedly stealing more than $8 million in cattle,” cbs7.com, January
8, 2018

____

NCBA Cowboy Poetry Contest Finalists’ videos, vote through January 15, 2018

Visiting Kansas’ Iconic ‘Home On The Range,’” by C.J. Janovy, Here and Now, January 3,
2018

__________

21st Century Working Horses,” by William Reynolds, Western Horseman, January 2, 2018

__________

2017 – A Year to Forget,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  January 1, 2018

Colorado Cowboy Poetry Gathering, January 19-21, 2018

 

GIT HIM SLICKER BROKE, by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

rainkisk

GIT HIM SLICKER BROKE
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

When yore breakin’ out a broncho,
Better get him slicker broke;
Or sometime you’ll have to try it
When it isn’t any joke.
When the wind begins a blowin’
Till it snaps his mane and tail,
And you see a black cloud comin’
Full of lightnin’ rain and hail.

And you know if you it him off
He will likely pull away
So you try it in the saddle
And yore hopin’ that you stay
But yore horse starts a buckin’
When you git it halfway on.
While yore arms and sleeves is tangled
Then he throws you and he’s gone.

It’s a mighty nasty feelin’
That a feller caint explain;
When yore standin’ there bare headed
And plum helpless, in the rain.
Fer yore slicker’s tore and busted
And the wind has took yore hat;
And you see yore hoss and saddle
Go driftin’ down the flat.

‘Bout that time you git an idee
And you don’t furgit it, pal.
Better slicker break a broncho
In a mighty good corral

…by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

This poem appears in Bruce Kiskaddon’s second book, Rhymes of the Ranges and Other Poems, published in 1947.

Kiskaddon worked for ten years as a cowboy, starting in 1898, working in southeastern Colorado’s Picketwire area. He wrote many poems still read and recited today. See features about him at CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/kisk.htm

The great Bill Owen (1942-2013) was a storyteller, too, with his paintings.They invite you in. This one, “Waiting Out the Storm,” is a perfect example. His web site quotes him about this painting, “Typical of Arizona, the cowboys figured the rain would end shortly, so those who had a slicker threw it over their saddle to keep it dry and then sat in the saddle house until the storm passed.”

Bill Owen was a cowboy’s painter. His web site tells, “Bill always felt compelled to record what he believed to be the true endangered species of our time: the contemporary working cowboy. He was extremely passionate about the importance of portraying each and every detail with complete accuracy.His greatest accomplishments and proudest moments were realized when a true cowboy looked at one of his pieces and said, ‘That’s exactly the way it is!’”

At the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, we were honored to have Bill Owen’s “Born to This Land” as the 2010 Cowboy Poetry Week poster art.

Find more about Bill Owen at CowboyPoetry.com and at billowenca.com. Another way Bill Owen’s legacy continues is with the Bill Owen, Cowboy Artist, Memorial Scholarship Fund, Inc., which “…provides scholarships to young people of the Arizona ranching community to further their education beyond high school.”

Special thanks to Valerie Owen Fillhouer for her generous permission for the use of this image.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this image with this post, but for any other use, please request permission. The poem is in the public domain.)

CODE OF THE COW COUNTRY, by S. Omar Barker (1894–1985)

dawngeff

CODE OF THE COW COUNTRY
by S. Omar Barker (1894–1985)

It don’t take such a lot of laws
To keep the rangeland straight,
Nor books to write ’em in, because
There’s only six or eight.
The first one is the welcome sign—
True brand of western hearts:
“My camp is yours an’ yours is mine,”
In all cow country parts.

Treat with respect all womankind,
Same as you would your sister.
Take care of neighbors’ strays you find,
And don’t call cowboys “mister.”
Shut pasture gates when passin’ through;
An’ takin’ all in all,
Be just as rough as pleases you,
But never mean nor small.

Talk straight, shoot straight, and never break
Your word to man nor boss.
Plumb always kill a rattlesnake.
Don’t ride a sorebacked hoss.
It don’t take law nor pedigree
To live the best you can!
These few is all it takes to be
A cowboy—and a man!

© S. Omar Barker, reprinted with the permission of the estate of S. Omar
Barker

We interrupt our week of poems about rain with information about this year’s 21st annual National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo, August 2-4, 2018 in Abilene, Kansas.

Geff Dawson, who with Dawn Dawson heads the National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo, recites this S. Omar Barker poem on the latest double CD from CowboyPoetry.com, MASTERS: VOLUME TWO, the poetry of S. Omar Barker.

Barker, as described in Cowboy Miner Productions’ collection of his work, “…was born in the rugged Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico… a rancher, high school teacher, college professor, forest ranger, soldier, outdoorsman, and legislator…” He was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America, Inc. and many of his poems were published by Western Horseman. Find more about S. Omar Barker at CowboyPoetry.com.

ncpr2017

The National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo describes their events, “…There are competition levels for beginners and Silver Buckle winners, cash prizes, trophy buckles and more. Anyone can compete—bring your best poetry or recited poetry and compete with us. It’s tons of fun and you get to meet a whole lot of people who love the same thing you do—cowgirl/cowboy poetry. Competition dates are August 3-4, 2018, in Abilene, Kansas, during the Wild Bill Hickok Rodeo and Kansas Free Fair! For more information, click our web site at www.ncpr.us. Entry forms, rules and our 2018 schedule are all available on the web site…”

Many poets have participated over the years, and have high praise for the experience, including Yvonne Hollenbeck, Doris Daley, Linda Kirkpatrick, DW Groethe, Andy Nelson, the late Pat Richardson, and many others. A celebration of “excellence through competition,” many lasting friendships are made.

The associated Chisholm Trail Western Music & Cowboy Poetry Show is August 4, 2018 in Abilene, Kansas.

Find more about the National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo at ncpr.us and on Facebook.

These photos include Geff and Dawn Dawson (far right, horseback) and the judges of the 2017 National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo, including Oklahoma poet and rancher Jay Snider and others. Thanks to Geff and Dawn for the photos.

(Please respect copyright. You can share this poem and these photos with this post, but for other uses, request permission.)