Featured

CowboyPoetry.com

This is an interim blog for CowboyPoetry.com, maintained while a new site is being built. All of the old site remains available at CowboyPoetry.com. This blog includes news, events, poetry, and more.

Visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

cowboybar
This photo, taken in Dodson, Montana, is by Stan Howe, Montana singer, songwriter, musician, storyteller, writer, radio host, auctioneer, and fiddle expert.

______________________

Find our current individual donors and sponsors here on this blog.

See all of the generous supporters to the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry and find how to be a part of it all here.

______________________

You can make a donation by check or money order, by mail (please use the form here for mail) or by a secure, on-line credit card payment through PayPal (a PayPal account is not required):

x-click-but21

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of The Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, a tax-exemptnon-profit organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Service Act. The Center seeks grants and donations from individuals, corporate entities, foundations, and private sources.

Contributions to the Center are fully deductible for federal income tax purposes.

The BAR-D Roundup fair market value is $15 and that amount is not deductible as a charitable contribution.

As in all professional journalistic endeavors, no editorial preference is given to financial sponsors or supporters.

VISIT OUR SPONSORS

wfc

kencook

ncprbanner07

 

cow09Banner

WMAWebBanne13

marciBroyhill_Banner09

snider2012

tomMorganBanner1

Hollenbeckbanner2012

heber2017

cowboyjamBanner2015

JeanPrescott2016 (1)

raNGE_2013_BANNER_2

abAR-D Banner

spalding2014azcp2018

cc2

Center_banner2_060307

THE BANKER AND THE INSURANCE MAN by Yvonne Hollenbeck

12391940_1193103440717168_2031578552972390021_n

THE BANKER AND THE INSURANCE MAN
by Yvonne Hollenbeck

When the banker pays a visit
to check your inventory,
the way he figures assets
is quite a different story
than the values placed upon them
by the one who sells insurance;
and if those two would switch their jobs,
it’d really make a difference.

The first thing that the banker does
is want to claim your land.
He says it isn’t worth too much,
but on the other hand
he needs it for security
’cause the cattle market’s down,
but he can’t loan you cash on it,
’cause it is only land.

The value of your cattle
is the price the packer pays;
your machinery isn’t worth a darn,
it’s seen its better days.
You can’t borrow on your good old horse,
you can’t borrow on your wife;
your house ain’t worth a tinker’s damn,
and neither is your life.

But here comes your insurance man,
he sings a different song.
He says your horse is worth a lot!
You knew that all along.
He says you need a policy
just in case it meets its fate,
and you’d better get a big one
on your kind and loving mate.

He says, “She’s worth a million
if you figured up the cost
of hiring folks to do her work;
without her you’d be lost.
And if lightning hit some cattle,
the loss would be immense;
heck, you’ve got a hundred thousand
in just windmills, tanks and fence.”

When that agent finished tallying,
it looked like we were wealthy;
the way he figures assets
make your finances look quite healthy.
So, I hope you see my point of them
switching jobs, you see
‘cause if bankers sold insurance,
not very much there’d be,

But if insurance agents started
making agriculture loans,
we’d all be driving brand new cars
and living in new homes.
We’d be looking pretty prosperous
and live a rich man’s life
and instead of buying life insurance,
you’d just mortgage one good wife!

© 2012, Yvonne Hollenbeck
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

Popular cowboy poet and champion quilter Yvonne Hollenbeck includes this poem in her recent book, Rhyming the Range, and a CD by the same name. Both collect her original poems about her life on the ranch. The book includes the most requested poems from her two out-of-print books and all of her newest poetry.

In coming months, find Yvonne at the Western Folklife Center’s 34th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada, January 29-February 3, 2018 and the 32nd annual Texas Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Alpine, March 2-3, 2018.

March 20-24, 2018 she’ll be at Pigeon Forge’s Mountain Quiltfest in Tennessee. She and Jean Prescott will present programs, including Yvonne’s trunk show, “Patchwork of the Prairie,” along with poetry and music. Yvonne’s family collection of 40 quilts spans 140 years and includes her own prize-winning works. Yvonne’s fellow ranchwife and celebrated quilter, Vi Colombe, will also be at Quiltfest.

Yvonne is featured in the multiple award-winning Everything in the Song is True, Doug Morrione’s award-winning feature-length documentary film “of four iconic western characters” (Gary McMahan, Yvonne Hollenbeck, Brice Chapman, and Greg Nourse). Find more about the film at everythinginthesongistrue.com and on Facebook.

Find Yvonne’s complete schedule, which includes quilting events and more, at yvonnehollenbeck.com. Find more of Yvonne Hollenbeck’s poetry at CowboyPoetry.com.

This is a photo of the Hollenbeck’s South Dakota ranch, where Yvonne and her champion calf-roper husband Glen raise cattle and quarter horses.

A COWBOYIN’ DAY by Gary McMahan

15879136_1324281820978792_2132717281_n

A COWBOYIN’ DAY
by Gary McMahan

Morning is just a thin line to the East
As you steps in the corral and captures a beast.
Cold saddle blankets, hey cock-a-doodle-doo—
Don’t buck now, you booger; you’ll break me in two.

Your head starts working on the last pass around;
Saddle horses are wrangled, draft horses cut out.
You shuts the gate and steps to the ground—
It’s hot, black coffee you’re thinking ’bout now.

Then it’s biscuits and gravy and eggs over light,
And the foreman’s wife is a beautiful sight.
Jokes and jabs and the cowboss’s orders,
A chew and a toothpick, and you’re out the door

To saddle the horse you’ll use for the day,
Makin’ sure your riggin’ has no extra play.
You steps aboard light with him all gathered up
’Cause you know first hand this critter can buck.

Ease him out at a walk and head north towards the dump.
You’ll be askin’ a trot when he loses his hump.
You hits a slow lope on the badger highway;
It’s a cool morning, blue-sky cowboyin’ day.

And the brooks are babbling down through the holes,
The meadowlarks sing the song in your soul,
And the wildflowers blaze any color you s’pose
As the smell of sagebrush and pine fill your nose.

Now the horse that you’re on is big, and he’s lean—
Quick, tough, smart, and a little bit mean.
His saddle’s no place for the meek or the green;
He’s a sho-nuff rip-snortin’ cowboyin’ machine.

And the place that you’re headed is pretty intense;
Continental Divide is the back fence.
There’s ten thousand acres of mountain and rock there
And twelve hundred head to check and to doctor.

And to make matters worse (or better, you think),
They’re all yearling heifers—unpredictable dinks.
They’ll run and they’ll hide ’til hell freezes twice
Then kick up their heels as you skate on the ice.

But this ain’t no colt, and you ain’t no kid,
So you whips out your rope and pulls down your lid,
And you climbs and cruises the sagebrush and aspen
’Til you finds you a cow brute what’s droopy and raspin’.

And maybe you’ll tag ’er ’fore she gits to the brush
And trip ’er and tie ’er in a big rush
And pack her with sulfa and penicillin.
She’ll turn for the better, good Lord a willin’.

Lots of footrot and pinkeye today,
But that don’t mean the boogers can’t play.
They’ve ducked and they’ve dodged ’til who laid a chunk,
But you managed to capture a pretty good hunk.

A line-backed old heifer with a sly side dart
Almost upset the whole apple cart,
And a bald-faced old bag sure slammed on her brakes
When we dived off a ledge and got in her way.

It’s the heat of the day now—sun’s straight overhead—
And you and your horse are packing some lead.
You hanker for rest and a biscuit or two,
And you figures you got that much coming to you.

Now your horse likes the grass that grows ’neath the aspen,
And the shade there is welcome as peace everlastin’.
So you finds such a place with a creek close by
To soothe the bruises of a hard ride.

You hobbles, unbridles him, loosens his girth
Then sets yourself down in the cool, green earth,
Surrounds your grub and drinks your fill
And takes a siesta way back in the hills.

Well, a catnap is all you require;
Still, you lay there and ponder your thoughts . . .
The world sure has its briars.
Take, for instance, this good old cow-hoss—

He was a wild-eyed, ring-tailed dandy.
Heck, they give up on him ’fore they give him to me,
But it’s the same for horses as it is for men—
He just needed a job and a kick in the shin.

Well the afternoon’s spent with the usual flair:
A close call here, a catastrophe there.
But still we saved more than a couple of hides;
That’s why we get paid for making these rides.

A storm blew through for about thirty minutes,
And you’d swear that Satan hisself was in it.
You’re sure glad your pony is seasoned plumb through—
Close lightning’s unloaded a few buckaroos.

You’re wet as a fish, but you ain’t gonna melt,
And the sun feels the best it ever has felt.
You’re all steamed up like an overdue freight,
But you’re dry as a duck time you get to the gate.

Now, there are those who thinks a cowboy’s a crude, ignorant cuss.
Truth is, we no-savvy them; they no-savvy us.
But there’s one thing that sticks in my mind
When a cowboy’s job cuts into sublime.

It’s when you and your horse form a leathery feather
And drift two, three yearlings out of a gather
And trail ’em up someplace they don’t want to go
When they’re needing a vet or what ever, y’know.

You set ’em just so when you go through a gate,
And don’t rile ’em up, for heaven’s sake.
Folks that have tried it say it’s kind of an art
To pen ’em in the home corral before dark.

And we’re trailin’ two of em home this night.
We’ll prolly ship the one; the other’ll be all right.
But one wrong move now the air’s turning cool,
And these two yearling heifers’ll make you look like a fool.

Punch ’em into the catch with a “whoop” and a smile.
You been walkin’ on eggs for the last two miles,
And if one woulda broke, the fur woulda flew—
No tellin’ when you’da got another crack at them two.

Your horse rolls in the dirt while you put up your tack,
Then savors his grain while you scratch his back.
It’s an evenin’ ritual you both enjoy;
You don’t covet nothin’ when you ride this ol’ boy.

An he heads for the timothy down by the lake
Whilst you saunters to the house for soup and steak
To mix it up with compadres and finish your pie
Like folks do when they’re satisfied.

When supper’s done, there’s little time for play—
You sleep hard all night if you work hard all day—
But ’fore you fall off your log to float in the air,
You may have time for a little prayer:

“Lord, I thank you for this cowboyin’ day.
I sure had me some fun a-earnin’ my pay,
And I like to think I put meat on the table
For a country that needs to stay fit an’ able.

“But a cow with no horse is boring as hell,
And a horse with no cows don’t ring my bell.
It’s a good life you gave me, these horses and cattle,
And I wanted to say thanks Lord for my day in the saddle.”

© 1986, Gary McMahan
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Cowboy, poet, songwriter, and yodeler Gary McMahan’s vivid “A Cowboyin’ Day” is a contemporary cowboy poetry standout.

In his book, Gary McMahan in Poetry and Song, he writes about it, “One of my favorite things is working cattle on a good horse in the high country. I used to do a considerable amount of it, and even though this poem doesn’t have a ‘Hollywood plot,’ a lot of ranch folk have told me how much they like it, especially those who’ve ever run a bunch of yearlin’s.”

The current “Cowboy Crossroads” podcast from Andy Hedges is a don’t-miss conversation with Gary McMahan. Gary talks about his life and work, including his music career and influences. He also tells some wild stories and shares the story of the creation of his popular song “The Old Double Diamond,” which has become a cowboy anthem and has been sung by Ian Tyson, Chris LeDoux, and manyothers. The episode gives a great look at Western music history. Find it and all the “Cowboy Crossroads” episodes at andyhedges.com/cowboy-crossroads.

At Gary McMahan’s web site, singingcowboy.com, you can listen to “A Cowboyin’ Day” and the full-length tracks of all his albums of his music and poetry.

Gary describes this photo, “Waitin’ for Spring. Me on the T Lazy 7 ranch outside of Aspen in the late ’70s or early ’80s…”

Find more about Gary at CowboyPoetry.com, his site, and on Facebook.

Vinton Cowboy Poetry & Music Show, Vinton, California March 16 and 17, 2018

Version 2

32nd annual Vinton Cowboy Poetry & Music Show
“Oldest and Best Cowboy Poetry Show in California”  
March 16 and 17, 2018

Featuring:

BELINDA GAIL – singer songwriter

SOURDOUGH SLIM – singer- humorist

 JOE HERRINGTON –  storyteller – poet

Friday and Saturday evening shows at 7:30 PM

Saturday matinee at 2:00 PM

Cost of each show is $23

 

Friday evening – Corned Beef and Cabbage dinner 5:00 – 7:00 PM Cost $12

Saturday evening – Roast Beef dinner 4:30 – 7:00 PM   Cost $12

 

SIERRA VALLEY GRANGE HALL
92202 Highway 70
VINTON, CA 96135

For tickets and information contact:

vintoncbpoetry@yahoo.com

sierravalleygrange.org

Phone 831-345-9840

Always on the 3rd weekend in March.

 

BILL BURK’S Rx by Chris Isaacs

20258176_1801380073211504_6393715218728575589_n

BILL BURK’S Rx
by Chris Isaacs

I saw Bill Burk the other day
And we stopped a while to visit.
He says, “I see you’re still packin’ them mules.
Your life’s ambition, is it?

I said, Bill, I think it’s a curse,
These cowboy boots and hats.
You try it once, you’re hooked for life,
And I really think that’s

“Kinda like a vow of poverty
Them monks and friars kae.
It sounds OK a-goin’ in,
But the rewards are all just fake.

“I day-work every spring and fall.
I feed some when it snows.
Then wrangle dudes all summer long,
And pack hunters till that slows.

“Shoe horses for everyone in town,
Till I can’t straighten up my back,
And still when tax time comes around
I’ve gotta go and hock my kack.

“There ain’t no money in it,
That’s for certain and for true,
But I just can’t seem to give it up.
There ain’t nothing else I want to do.”

Now, ol’ Bill, he mulled a bit
On this “condition” we both had.
He shook his head and then he said,
“I know the feeling, lad.

“It’s a sickness lad, that’s for sure;
You’ll have to wait till you die.
It’s worse than whiskey, weed, or dope,
And that’s the reason I

“Think they ought to make a vaccine for it;
Just give you a shot to keep you pure.
‘Cause once you get that ‘cowboyitis’
There dang sure ain’t no cure.”

© 2001, Chris Isaacs
This poem should not be reposted or reprinted without permission

Cowboy, packer, and popular poet and humorist Chris Isaacs tells, in his book, Rhymes, Reasons, and Pack Saddle Proverbs, that, “I wrote this poem after a visit I had with my neighbor, Bill Burk. I had my horses and mules loaded and was at the Circle K gassing up when Bill pulled up and this conversation took place.”

Chris also shared this photo, and commented, “In some of the steep sided mesas and canyons we have sometimes found this is a good way to go up, easy on the horses and cowboys too. We always called it ‘tailin’ out.'”

See Chris next at the Spirit of West Cowboy Gathering in Ellensburg, Washington, February 16-18, 2018. Chris joins featured performers Wylie and Wild West, Trinity Seely, Lauralee Northcott, Thatch Elmer, Panhandle Cowboys, and Paul Wilson. Daytime performers include Tom Swearingen, Andy Bales, Duane Nelson, Barbara Nelson, Jane Bailey, Kathy Moss, David Anderson and Jenny Lynn, Joe Sartin, Rocking RW, Stan Kvistad, and TR Stewart. Find more at ellensburgcowboygathering.com.

Chris will also be a part of the Texas Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Alpine, March 2-3, 2018.

Chris Isaacs collects stories in his new book, An Element of Truth. Red Steagall writes, “…Chris Isaacs is a master storyteller and poet. He will take you on some incredible journeys….” If you follow Chris on Facebook, you’ll see he’s been in a storytelling mode. Find more about Chris Isaacs in a feature at CowboyPoetry.com and at his site, chrisisaacs.com.

News Bits and Links

readingnews“Reading the News,” by Erwin E. Smith, c. 1908 from The Library of Congress

We receive and come across all sorts of interesting information from a wide range of sources. Below, we gather some quick links to news stories, web features, and other items of interest gathered from the web, social media, and from you, the most recent posted first.

Your suggestions for consideration of inclusion are welcome (as well as your comments). Email us.

_____________________________

Ranching by the signs,” by Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns, tsln.com, January 11, 2018

Women Writing About the Wild: 25 Essential Authors,” Kathryn Aalto, outsideonline.com, January 9, 2018

__________

Singer Ian Tyson on his early folk days and being inspired by Bob Dylan,” by Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail, January 8, 2018

__________

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Gary McMahan (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, January 9, 2018

Things You Can Count On,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  January 8, 2018

The Birth of the American Cowboy,” Christopher Knowlton excerpt, Delanceyplace.com,
January 8, 2018

My Favorite Book, Part 12,” by Rod Miller, blog,  January 8, 2018

Cowboy Poets Ramble Back To Golden,” by Jean Lotus, patch.com, January 8, 2018

Man arrested after allegedly stealing more than $8 million in cattle,” cbs7.com, January
8, 2018

____

NCBA Cowboy Poetry Contest Finalists’ videos, vote through January 15, 2018

Visiting Kansas’ Iconic ‘Home On The Range,’” by C.J. Janovy, Here and Now, January 3,
2018

__________

21st Century Working Horses,” by William Reynolds, Western Horseman, January 2, 2018

__________

2017 – A Year to Forget,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com,  January 1, 2018

Colorado Cowboy Poetry Gathering, January 19-21, 2018

__________

Kazakhstan Prizes Its Cowboys, but Few Want to Saddle Up for Harsh Life,” by Andrew Higgins, New York Times, December 30, 2017

‘The Tabasco Man,’ cowboy poet Stan Tixier, dies at 85,” by Janae Francis, Standard-
Examiner, December 30, 2017

Arizona rancher on Mexico border uses science to breed sustainable cattle,” by Shayla
Hyde, Cronkite News, December 27, 2017

_________

John Stanley Tixier, 1932-2017,” Legacy.com, December 27, 2017 and more

Down on the Farm,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, December 26, 2017

South Dakota Quarter Horse Association celebrates breeding legacies,” farmforum.net, December 26, 2017

Coyotes Are Colonizing Cities. Step Forward the Urban Hunter,” by Simon Romero, New York Times, December 26, 2017

__________

Christmas at the BAR-D

__________

Cowboy Poets To Return To New Hampton,” by Bob Fenske, nhtrib.com, December 22, 2017

Mike Beck’s world of music and horses,” by Beth Peerless, Monterey Herald, December 21, 2017

Horse Talk: Baxter Black shops for gifts,” by Kathy Young, vvdailypress.com, December 21, 2017

Western Horseman and Cowboy Artists of America announce 2017 Youth Art Contest winners, Western Horseman, December 2017

Cattlemen’s dinner is January 6,” Alamosa News, December 21, 2017

__________

Complete daily schedule for the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, December 20, 2017

What’s Christmas to a Cow?,” by Baxter Black (a poem in the latest column), BaxterBlack.com, December 19, 2017

__________

Another dispatch from the saddlebag,” by Rod Miller, blog, December 18, 2017

Saddlebag Dispatches Autumn/Winter 2017

Photos: Cowboy Christmas Concert hosted by Dakota Western Heritage Festival,”
Capital Journal, December 16, 2017

__________

Calling all cowboy poets,” Agrinews, December 17, 2017

Custer State Park fire mop-up begins,” by Traci Eatherton, Tri-State Livestock News,
December 15, 2017

Young cattleman has found his way,” by Kylene Scott, High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal,
December 12, 2017

__________

Roy ‘Cow Gal’ poet’s book named best in nation,” by Janae Frances, Standard-Examiner, December 16, 2017

Rescue horse’s incredible reaction to seeing snow for the first time goes viral,” by Alex Lasker, AOL.com, December 15, 2017

__________

A Night of Cowboy Poetry — Poems, Songs, and Cowpunchers,” by Megan Willome, tweetspeakpoetry.com, December 15, 2017

__________

Riders in the Sky Plot 40th Anniversary Album, 2018 Tour,” by Stephen L. Betts, rollingstone.com, December 15, 2017

The Braun Boys – All Grown Up,” by the Western Folklife Center, blog, December 14, 2017

__________

Black Hills Cowboy Christmas,” by Yvonne Hollenbeck,  Tri-State Livestock News, December 14, 2017

Free and Easy: Dave Stamey’s Occasional Newsletter,” Facebook, December 14, 2017

[Australian] National Folk Festival…,” broadwayworld.com,  December 13, 2017

__________

The Godless Democrat Who Loves Cowboy Poetry,” by Carson Vaughan, The Paris Review, December 13, 2017

Legion Lake Fire grows to 35,000 acres,” Black Hills FOX, December 13, 2017

The Top 10 North Pole reindeer management issues,” by Mark Parker, FarmTalk, December 12, 2017

__________

The Dog and the Rabbit,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, December 11, 2017

Massive ranch formerly owned by Mars candy heir sells; asking price was $64.8M,” by
Brett French, Casper Star-Tribune, December 12, 2017

Hitting a wall, halfway to way way-away,” by Don Stuart, Rushville Republican, December 12, 2017

Court Sides with New Mexico Cattle Ranchers in Water Dispute,” by Tiffany Dowell, agrilife.org, December 11, 2017

Lies They Tell Writers, Part 42: Know (and Follow) the Rules,” by  Rod Miller, blog, December 8, 2017

Spirit of the West poster art submissions

Drovers of the Chisholm Trail,” (video) Western Horseman, December 5, 2017

Live from The Cowboy Poetry Gathering,” The Moth, wbez.org, December 5, 2017

Painting spirits bright,” by Yvonne Hollenbeck, Tri-State Livestock News, November 29, 2017

_________

Hunting Camp Cook,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, December 4, 2017

Nominations sought for Oregon’s next poet laureate,” by Barney Lerten, ktvz.com, December 1, 2017

Training Cattle to Follow – Part 1” by John Marble, On Pasture, November 27, 2017

__________

news12   BAR-D general newsletter, December 1, 2017  Subscribe here.

__________

BeefUSA Cowboy Poetry contest

__________

Colorado’s Renowned and Under the Radar Festivals Not to Be Missed in 2018,”
digitaljournal.com, November 30, 2017

Monterey Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival trucks on – with verve – at Golden State,” by Adam Joseph, Monterey County Weekly, November 30, 2017

Unplugging in the Texas Hill Country River Region,” by Shannah Compton Game and Jeff Game, huffingtonpost.com, November 30, 2017

Christmas bustle hits Wickenburg,” The Wickenburg Sun, November 29, 2017

__________

Ordinary Skin: Essays from Willow Springs,” (review) by Kim Kankiewicz, Center for Literary Publishing, Colorado State University, November 28, 2017

Live from The Cowboy Poetry Gathering,” (audio) The Moth, November 28, 2017

These Montana Ranchers are Helping Grizzlies, Wolves and Cattle Coexist,” by Kristina
Johnson, ensia.com, November 28, 2017

__________

The Right Tool for the Job,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, November 27, 2017

A Cowboy Kind of Party,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, November 27, 2017

The British Columbia Cowboy Heritage Society (BCCHS) latest newsletter, November 25, 2017

My Favorite Book, Part 11,” by Rod Miller, blog, November 25, 2017

Ranching, Kauai Style,” by Duane McCartney, Canadian Cattleman, November 24, 2017

_________

Paul Zarzyski on the Monterey Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival, December 2, 2017

_________

Thanksgiving,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, November 20, 2017

Look Him in the Eye,” by Kate Bradley, Western Horseman, November 20, 2017

Reaching Neighbors in need from Mandalay Bay,” by Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns, Tri-State Livestock News, November 17, 2017

Toe-tapping Western music at Chisholm Trail Heritage Center,” by Allie Haddicam, kwso.com, November 17, 2017

Duncan’s Chisholm Trail Heritage Center hosting Campfires, Cattle & Cowboys Gathering
benefit…,” by Brandy McDonnell, newsok.com, November 17, 2017

Back in the saddle at a historic Saskatchewan ranch,” by Tom Johnson, thestar.com, November 16, 2017

Rare photo of Billy the Kid bought at flea market could sell for millions,” CBS News, Yahoo.com, November 16, 2017

Were people in the Old West better than now?,” by Rod Miller, blog, November 15, 2017

__________

Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West December 3-March 11, 2018, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City, Utah

Out of respect for the angels,” by Jessie Veeder, Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch blog, November 13, 2017

Cold Feet,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, November 13, 2017

Sights and Sounds From the Spade Ranch,” (video), Western Horseman, November 14, 2017

Can You Read Brands?,” Written by By Jay Mack, February 1951, Western Horseman, November 13, 2017

Vaqueros ride and rope again in Santa Ynez,” Santa Ynez Valley News, November 11, 2017

_________

Western Music Association 2017 Award winners

__________

Most people meet in a cattle market, this couple got married in one,” by Mark Duell, Daily Mail, November 9, 2017

Free concert at Luna Rossa Winery,” The Deming Headlight, November 9, 2017

They Were Salty: A story of old-time cowboys and the names, or no-names, they made for themselves,” by Ross Santee, written August 1949, Western Horseman, November 9, 2017

Theft of instruments unites Western music community,” by Ollie Reed Jr., Albuquerque Journal, November 7, 2017

__________

Moose Alert,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, November 6, 2017

Floating Horses: The Life of Casey Tibbs,” Western Horseman, November 6, 2017

New Day, Old Ways,” by Ross Hexcox (photo blog), Western Horseman, November 6, 2017

Cultured Cowboy,” by Rod Miller, blog, November 5, 2017

__________

Singer, Arizona activist Katie Lee dies at 98,” by Corina Vanek, Arizona Daily Sun, November 1, 2017

Katie Lee, ‘Goddess of Glen Canyon,’ Dies at Age 98,” by Gillian Ferris, knau.org, November 1, 2017

Amber Cross Brings the Full Picture on ‘Savage on the Downhill,” by Trevor Christian, Glide Magazine, October 31, 2017

Tradition and Patriotism Show their Colors at Red Steagall’s 27th Annual Cowboy Gathering,” RFD-TV, October 31, 2017

__________

Remembering Paps, My Grandfather,” by Justin L. Stewart, blog, October 29, 2017

__________

Publisher Gibbs Smith, who reinvented Western stories from his Utah barn, dies at 77,”
By Ellen Fagg Weist, Salt Lake Tribune, October 30, 2017

Photos: Visitors flock to Heber for one of largest cowboy poetry gatherings in US,” by Grant Olsen, KSL.com, October 30, 2017

Cowboy Christmas concert – a new Pierre area tradition starting this year?, “by Dave Askins, Capital Journal, October 30, 2017

Learn how the historic Empire Ranch survived a raging wildfire,” by Doug Kreutz-Arizona Daily Star, Half Moon Bay Review, October 28, 2017

Outspoken Corb Lund says he’s done talking politics: ‘Put it in your song’,” by Theresa Tayler, Calgary Herald, October 28, 2017

Red Steagall interview, wfaa.com, October 27, 2017

Cowboy Up (Youtube) Episode 1  Episode 2

__________

Cowboy Crossroads of Lubbock, TX: ‘Telling the authentic story’,” by Kelly Moffitt, Flyover Podcast, October 27, 2017

Camera Crew Meets Cowboy Family,” by Jolyn Young, Desolate Ranch Wife blog, October 26, 2017

Re-Ride Stories,” by Rod Miller, blog, October 26, 2017

Cedar Livestock & Heritage Festival features Sheep Parade,” by The Independent, October 26, 2017

Lowell Jaeger: A Poetry Conversation,” by Mary Cloud Taylor, dailyinterlake.com, )ctober 24, 2017

Fall is here, time to panic,” by Amy Kirk, agupdate.com, October 20, 2017

__________

Mountain Remuda,” Ross Hecox, Western Horseman, October 25, 2017

2018 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering Spotify playlist

Branded…and That’s a Good Thing,” by Kelli Neubert, Western Horseman, October 24, 2017

Festus and the Coon,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, October 23, 2017

Yep…You Might Be A Rancher,” by Sara Brown, Drovers, October 19, 2017

__________

Wanted: Cowboy,” poem by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, October 16, 2017

Charlie Russell,” by John Mariani, January 1951, Western Horseman, October 16, 2017

Stories that begin on the back of a horse,” by Jessie Veeder, Inforum, October 13, 2017

Artisans team to boost poetry program,” by Eve Marx, Seaside Signal, October 13, 2017

Local Volunteers Gear Up For Annual Heritage Days,” by Anita Campbell, Benton County
Enterprise, October 13, 2017

__________

The 1,000-year-old man: The remarkable story of author Max Evans,” by Robert Nott, Santa Fe New Mexican, October 13, 2017

Alzada show draws large crowd,” by Chris Maupin, Ekalaka Eagle, October 13, 2017

__________

Trade-offs, but never satisfied,” by Laura Nelson, blackinkwithcab.com, October 11, 2017

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Hal Cannon (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, October 10, 2017

José and the Hoodoo Cow,” poem by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, October 9, 2017

2nd ‘Campout on the Comanche’ slated next weekend,” Big Spring Herald, October 7, 2017

Florida Ranchers Lose $238 Million to Irma,” by Greg Henderson, Drovers, October 6, 2017

__________

Get your ‘cowboy on’ and celebrate our western heritage,” by Pam Jacobs, The Durango Herald, October 6, 2017

Gathering Tickets Now Available,” Elko Daily Free Press, October 5, 2017

Beef Is Back for Dinner as Marketers Woo Nostalgic Millennials,” by Alexandra Bruell, Progressive Farmer, October 5, 2017

Western merriment meets modern-day fun at Agua Fria Festival,” by Sue Tone, Prescott Valley Tribune, October 4, 2017

Does Media Coverage of Wildfires Probe Deeply Enough?,” by Adrianne Kroepsch, Daily Yonder, October 3, 2017

Cowboy trends: Then and now,” by Tayler Teichert,  Progressive Cattleman, October 2, 2017

__________

Political Correctness,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, October 2, 2017

Plenty of singing Sunday morning (from livestock and people) during NILE,” by Sarah Brown, The Prairie Star, September 29, 2017

Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering to focus on cowboy humor this year,” by Linda Mannix, Pagosa Springs Sun, September 28, 2017

Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering to celebrate 29th year,” by Katie Chicklinski-Cahill, Durango Herald, September 27, 2017

__________

Requiem for a Cowboy Poet,” by Peggy Sanders, Wild West Magazine, September 28, 2017

Cowboy poetry draws 80,” by Thomas Garcia, Quay County Sun, September 27, 2017

Love that Cactus Bread,” by Gary Heintz, capjournal.com, September 27, 2017

28th Annual Alzada Cowboy Poetry, Music and Art Show,” by Chris Maupin, Butte County Post,  September 27, 2017

__________

They Were Salty,” by Ross Santee, written August 1949, Western Horseman, September 25, 2017

Happy Birthday, Ft. Pierre: cowtown celebrates the old-fashioned way,” by Yvonne Hollenbeck, Tri-State Livestock News, September 21, 2017

__________

Stress,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, September 25, 2017

__________

Badger Clark Festival Headlines Busy Day In Hot Springs,” by John Axtell, chadrad.com, September 23, 2017

Writing songs as honest as Wyoming dirt,” by Lance Nixon, pinedaleroundup.com, September 22, 2017

Gambling, Rambling, Ranching and Rehab Are six bred heifers a herd?,” by Bill Jones, Fairfield Sun Times, September 22, 2017

Cowboy Hat Etiquette: What You Should Already Know But Probably Don’t,” by Terry Sullivan, Fairfield Sun Times, September 22, 2017

Music Times: Engage in Southern Utah’s creative symposium,”  The Spectrum, September 22, 2017

The BC Cowboy Heritage Society newsletter, September

Western Slope Cowboy Gathering November 3-4, 2017, Grand Junction, Colorado

__________

From Space Cowboy to Montana Rancher,”by Russell Nemetz, northernag.net, September 21, 2017

Four Sixes Through the Lens of Scott Slusher,” by Bob Welch, September 20, 2017

Dallas County poet says she is just recording the life rhythms,” by Penny Warner,
BuffaloReflex.com, September 20, 2017

Authentic, Genuine, & the Integrity of Songwriting Debate,” by Thomas Mooney, New Slang, September 20, 2017

Embrace cowboy culture and humor at Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering,” by Linda Mannix, Pagosa Springs Sun, September 21, 2017

Hugs: a song that has a real message,” by Gary Heintz, Capital Journal, September 19, 2017

Murphey Western Institute  Michael Martin Murphey’s “Center for the Education, Preservation and Perpetuation of the Arts, Culture, History and Legacy of the American West”

__________

Angus way out there,” by Laura, BlackInk, September 20, 2017

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Mike Beck, part 2 (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, September 19, 2017

The Top 10 signs of autumn,” by Mark Parker, FarmTalk, September 19, 2017

This Season, Western Wildfires Are Close By and Running Free,” by Kirk Johnson, New York Times, September 16, 2017

Montana residents are desperate for clean air, and they’re calling me,” Washington Post, by Sarah Coefield, September 15, 2017

Perhaps You’d Like to Purchase Art Sculpted by a Cow,” by Cara Giaimo,  atlasobscura.com, September 15, 2017

__________

Dog Days in the Feedlot,” (poem) by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, September 18, 2017

Western Music Association 2017 nominees, September 18, 2017

Heritage Festival continues to build community connections,” by McKayla Helm, The Missourian, September 16, 2017

Longmire’s creator explains why we’re so fascinated with the American West,” by Craig Johnson, Washington Post, September 15

Cowboy poetry gathering welcomes attendees,” by Kevin Rushworth, High River Times,
September 15, 2017

Cattle drive brings history alive,” by Ryan Miller, Enid News & Eagle, September 15, 2017

Cowgirls are naturals at pen riding duties,” by Jeff Rice, Journal-Advocate, September 13, 2017

__________

AABP: The Baxter Black Perspective,” by Geni Wren, AABP, September 14, 2017

Ranchers blame exploding shell for grass fire that killed 160 head of cattle,” by Jackie Irwin, Calgary Herald, September 14, 2017

This Seventeen-Year-Old Rescued Cattle by Helicopter During Harvey,” by Charley Locke, Texas Monthly, September 12, 2017

A Visit with Western Folklife’s Kristin Windbigler,” by Maddy Butcher, Nicker News, September 6, 2017

__________

Cowboy poets and musicians will perform in Shoshone,” by Julie Wootton, magicvalley.com, September 13, 2017

Family History Expo To Be Held In St. George,” by V. Robison, Moapa Valley Progress,
September 13, 2017

Change of Venue for Campfire,” Dickinson Press, September 13, 2017

The Top 10 things farmers find in the pockets of jackets they haven’t worn since last spring,” by Mark Parker, FarmTalk, September 12, 2017

__________

Coyote Cowboy Observations,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, September 11, 2017

Cowboy Country Nevada,” The Hans India, September 9, 2017

‘The Lungs of Our Region Are on Fire:’ Wildfires Exact a Punishing Toll on the West,” by Nancy Wartik, New York Times, September 8, 2017

Real cowboys play for buckaroos-to-be at Napa school,” by Maria Sestito, Napa Valley Register, September 8, 2017

Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’: Chuck wagon cooking,” Molly Boyle, Santa Fe New Mexican, September 8, 2017

__________

Thousands of Texas cattle may have died in wake of Harvey,” Associated Press, September 8, 2017

Ranchers pay it forward to Montana fire victims,” by Amy Bickel, The Hutch News, September 8, 2017

Harvey roundup: Ranchers tally impact on soggy herds,” by Andrea Rumbaugh September 7, 2017

__________

Montana fires: Here’s what the nation hasn’t seen,” (video) Agdaily, September 6, 2017

Ash falls like snow in Seattle as wildfires rage in Pacific Northwest,” by Evan Bush and Hal Bernton, Seattle Times, September 6, 2017

Behind the Scenes Shipping Cattle in the Flint Hills,” by Wyatt Bechtel, Drovers, September 6, 2017

Vets Fight To Save Horses In Harvey Aftermath,” by David Lohr, huffingtonpost.com, September 4, 2017

The Yellow Ribbon,” by Baxter Black (latest column), BaxterBlack.com, September 4, 2017

Cowgirl Camp helps build skills, network among women ranchers,” by Matthew Weaver, Capital Press, September 1, 2017

__________

As Human Rescues Wind Down, Helicopters Drop Hay To Stranded Cattle,” by Brian Mann, Morning Edition, September 5, 2017

Devastation for Montana’s ranchers only just beginning,” by Taylor Chase,  kfbb.com,
September 4, 2017

Texas ranchers battle to save cattle from Harvey’s wrath,” by Meridith Edwards, CNN,
September 4, 2017

________

A Flying Cowboy Rides to Rescue Cattle Stranded in Harvey’s Floods,” by John Schwartz and Livia Albeck-Ripka, New York Times, September 3, 2017

Map: Large Wildfires In Montana,” by David Sherman, MTN News, September 2, 2017

More than half a million acres lost to Montana wildfires so far this summer,” by Steele Stephen,  MTN News, September 2, 2017

Cowboy way honored in museum in Gordon,” by Steve Frederick, starherald.com, September 1, 2017

Roots Run Deep TV special to premiere Sept. 4,” Douglas Dispatch, September 1, 2017

Good Things Happen at Peach Days,” by Jenny Chamberlain, hvtimes.com, September 1, 2017

__________

Cowboy Poetry Event” (S. Omar Barker show), Las Vegas Optic, September 1, 2017

Who is cowboy legend Myrtis Dightman?,” by Matthew Thibodeaux, easttexasmatters.com, September 1, 2017

__________

The Lives & Works of S. Omar & Elsa Barker show, September 2, 2017, Las Vegas, New Mexico

Cloud Rider,” by Ross Hecox, Western Horseman, August 31, 2017

Great Plains Fire Information, gpfireinfo.blogspot.com, August 30, 2017

Cowboy Crossroads with Andy Hedges,”  with Chuck Hawthorne (audio), Cowboy Crossroads, August 29, 2017

Texas Ranchers Scramble To Get Cattle Out Of Flooded Areas,” by Ailsa Chang, NPR, August 29, 2017

Hurricane Harvey: How you can help ranchers affected,” Tri-State Livestock News, August 29, 2017

Cattle on feed, drought and floods,” by Derrell S. Peel, FarmTalk, August 2, 2017

Is Poetry the New Adult Coloring Book?,” by Jason Boog, Publishers Weekly, August 25, 2017

 

WINTER HOSSES by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

16123389_259464731148939_7069137765417353216_n

photo © Ken Rodgers; request permission for use

 

WINTER HOSSES
by Bruce Kiskaddon (1878-1950)

You wake up in the mornin’
and you get yore coffee made.
The thermometer is ten degrees
‘bove zero in the shade.
But when once you get the taste
of good strong coffee in your throat.
You don’t mind the frosty mornin’.
You don’t even wear a coat.

You do put on yore overshoes
fer wadin’ in the snow.
You fill up all three nose bags
and then yore set to go.
The hosses come a nickerin’
and snuffin’ from the shed.
Each one reaches fer the nose bag
when you put it on his head.

You go back into the shack
and git youre breakfast started cookin’.
But you don’t furgit the horsses.
You have got to keep a lookin’.
When they finish, you have got to take
the nosebags off their heads.
Or they’ll grab ’em off each other
and they’ll tear ’em all to shreds.

Hosses act a heap like humans,
and they ain’t so much to blame.
There is shore a lot of people
that is doin’ jest the same.
And it’s mighty hard to stop ’em
at the stunts they try to pull;
Gittin’ sassy and destructive
jest because their belly’s full.

So I reckon there is some one
that has got to take a hand.
Lookin’ after brainless critters
that don’t seem to onderstand.
There’s hosses, cows and people
that you dassent leave alone.
They’d go plum to ruination
if you left ’em on their own.

…by Bruce Kiskaddon

Master poet Bruce Kiskaddon was a great observer of livestock and humans.

Bruce Kiskaddon worked for ten years as a cowboy, starting in 1898 in southeastern Colorado’s Picketwire area. He published short stories and nearly 500 poems. His poems are among the most admired and the most recited in the “classic” cowboy poetry canon.

Much of what is known about Kiskaddon and his work comes from Open Range, Bill Siems’ monumental collection of Kiskaddon’s poetry. Bill Siems also collected Bruce Kiskaddon’s short stories in a book called Shorty’s Yarns. Find more in the Kiskaddon features at CowboyPoetry.com.

This impressive photograph is by documentary filmmaker, teacher, poet, writer, and photographer Ken Rodgers. Ken and Betty Rodgers are co-producers of I Married the War, a documentary-in-progress about the wives of combat veterans. They also created the award-winning film Bravo! Common Men, Uncommon Valor. Find more about I Married the War at imarriedthewar.com and on Facebook, and more on “Bravo!” at bravotheproject.com and on Facebook.

Find more about Ken Rodgers at CowboyPoetry.com  and here on Facebook. Follow his daily photo posts on Instagram.

COWBOY’S OPINION by S. Omar Barker (1895-1985)

tsaug1616

COWBOY’S OPINION
by S. Omar Barker (1895-1985)

Of all God’s creatures I endorse
most heartily the one called “horse.”
That on this creature man might sit
no doubt is why God made him split!

© S. Omar Barker, reprinted with the permission of the estate of S. Omar Barker
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

Barker wrote some 2,000 poems in his long career, including many pithy short ones, like this one.

It’s told that Barker enjoyed signing his name with his brand, created from his initials and laid sideways for “Lazy SOB,” but, that’s not a completely accurate story. In an article written by Barker for “Hoofs and Horns” magazine, Barker introduces himself, “This S.O.B. (my initials, not my ancestry) has never claimed to qualify as a sure ‘nough cowboy.” Later in the article, he comments, “Incidentally, when I applied for (Lazy S O B) for our cattle brand, they wrote back that some other S O B already had it. So we had to be satisfied with (Lazy S B).” (Thanks to Andy Hedges for sharing the article, which he received from Vess Quinlan, who received it from Joel Nelson who received it from Kay Kelley Nowell.)

S. Omar Barker was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America, Inc. and many of his poems were published by Western Horseman. Find more about him at CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/sobarker.htm.

Oregon poet and horseman Tom Swearingen is pictured in an August, 2016 photo. Tom recites “Cowboy’s Opinion” on a forthcoming recording from CowboyPoetry.com.

Tom is among the poets and musicians featured at the Cochise Cowboy Poetry and Music Gathering, February 2-4, 2018 in Sierra Vista, Arizona. Known for its enthusiastic community and school involvement, the theme for the 2018 Cochise Cowboy Poetry & Music Gathering is “Barn Dance and Western Swing.” Find a history of the gathering, which started in 1993, here.

Featured performers are 3 Trails West, Floyd Beard, Almeda Bradshaw,,Patty Clayton,,The Cowboy Way, Doris Daley, Peggy Godfrey, Hanson Family, Joe Herrington, Jo Lynne Kirkwood, Carolyn and Dave Martin, Syd Masters Band, Doc Mehl, Notable Exceptions, Trinity Seely, Tom Swearingen, Barry Ward, and Joyce Woodson. Saturday Daytime Performers are Vic Anderson, Janet Bailey, Valerie Beard, Cimarron Sidekicks, Dean Cook, Joel Eliot, Thatch Elmer, Jessica Hedges, Ron Hinkle, Randy Houston, Steve Jones, Susie Knight, Mary Matli, Dave and Kathy McCann, James Michae, Mark Munzert, OK Chorale Trio, Ramblin’ Rangers, Dennis Russell, Gail Star, Rocky Sullivan, Miss “V”, and Washtub Jerry.

Find more at the gathering site, cowboypoets.com.

See Tom Swearingen also at the Spirit of the West Cowboy Gathering, February 16-18, 2018, in Ellensburg, Washington.

Find more about Tom Swearingen on Facebook and at his web site, oregoncowboypoet.com.